Concord Gas Light Company Gasholder House

Two-story, brick, cylindrical structure
Concord Gas Light Company Gasholder House

Photograph by John Daly, PAL, April 18, 2017

Quick Facts

Location:
Gas Street, Concord, New Hampshire
Significance:
Engineering
Designation:
Listed in the National Register – Reference number 100001962
OPEN TO PUBLIC:
No
MANAGED BY:
Private

The Concord Gas Light Company Gasholder House, in Concord, New Hampshire, is the last remaining example of a gasholder house in the United States that retains its interior wrought-iron gasholder. The storage tank held purified manufactured coal gas. The cylindrical brick structure was designed and erected by Deily & Fowler of Laurel Iron Works, Philadelphia. During the second half of the nineteenth century, coal gas was an important fuel for municipal, industrial, and domestic illumination and, therefore, played a significant role in the growth of American cities and industry. The Concord Gas Light Company, suppliers of illuminating gas to City of Concord, installed the Gasholder House in 1887–1888, during one of several late-nineteenth-century improvements to its facility on South Main Street.