Permits

Special Use Permits (SUPs)
A Special Use Permit is required for activities that provide a benefit to an individual, group, or organization, rather than the public at large and for activities that require some degree of management by the National Park Service in order to protect park resources and the public interest.

Permit applications require a $50 non-refundable processing fee and must be received by the park at least 1 month prior to proposed activity. Your submission of an application DOES NOT guarantee approval of a permit.

Activities and events that require Special Use Permits include:

  • The following activities related to Public Use Limits
    • Exceptions to Closures and Public Use Limits
    • Group visitation (picnics, family reunions, organized trips or tours)
    • Private ceremonies– See Ceremonies Section below.
    • Fund raising events
    • Any use that falls outside the hours of operations (sunrise to sundown)
    • Use of parking lots for other than visitor parking
    • Use of grills
    • Conduct a sports event, pageant, regatta, public spectator attraction, entertainment, ceremony, and similar events
    • First Amendment Activities with over 25 participants (see below)
    • Filming and Still Photography (see below)
    • Sale or distribution of printed matter that is not solely commercial advertising.
    • Soliciting or demanding gifts, money, goods, or services (pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit issued under 2.50, 2.51, or 2.52)
    • Advertisements (display, posting, or distribution).
    • Engaging in or soliciting any business.
    • Memorialization
      • (a) Erection of monuments (requires approval from Regional Director).
      • (b) Scattering of ashes from human cremation.
Freedom of speech, press, religion, and assembly are Constitutional Rights. However, the courts have recognized that activities associated with the exercise of these rights may be reasonably regulated to protect park resources. Therefore, all First Amendment activities with over 25 participants require special use permits, and the park may regulate the time, place, and manner in which they are conducted. First Amendment activities with less than 25 participants who utilize designated areas do not require a permit. Some examples of special events that require permits are:
  • Distribution and/or sale of printed matter
  • Religious services
  • Scattering of ashes
  • Public demonstrations or assemblies, etc.
  • Collecting signatures for petitions
Changes to Commercial Filming Permits on Park Land
On January 22, 2021, the US District Court for the District of Columbia issued a decision in Price v. Barr determining the permit and fee requirements applying to commercial filming under 54 USC 100905, 43 CFR Part 5, and 36 CFR Part 5.5 are unconstitutional. The National Park Service has issued interim guidance as of February 22, 2021, to manage filming activities. Under the interim guidance, filming activities may require a permit if they pose a threat to park resources or the visitor experience. The National Park Service intends to update regulations addressing filming activities that are consistent with the outcome of Price v. Barr. Once effective, those regulations will replace and supersede the interim guidance.

As regulations regarding commercial filming permits are being reassessed, those interested in commercial filming activities on land managed by the National Park Service are encouraged to contact the park directly for more information about filming in the park and to discuss how to minimize potential impacts to visitors and sensitive park resources.

Do I need a permit to film?
Under the interim guidance, the National Park Service is not distinguishing between types of filming, such as commercial, non-commercial, or news gathering. Low-impact filming activities will not require a special use permit, but non-low-impact filming may require a permit to consider its potential impacts on park resources and visitor activities.

Low-Impact Filming
“Low-impact filming’ is defined as outdoor filming activities in areas open to the public, except areas managed as wilderness, involving five people or less and equipment that will be carried at all times, except for small tripods used to hold cameras. Those participating in low-impact filming activities do not need a permit and are not required to contact the park in advance. If low-impact filmers have questions about areas where they want to film, they should contact the park directly.

All applicable laws and regulations governing activities and public use in parks still apply, including park hours and areas open and closed to the public. Videographers, filmers, producers, directors, news and other staff associated with filming are reminded that rules and regulations that apply to all park visitors still apply to filming activities even if no permit is needed for their activity. Check with the park staff for more information on closures, sensitive resources, and other safety tips.

Non-Low-Impact Filming
Filming activities that do not meet the description of low-impact filming requires at least ten days advance notice to the National Park Service by contacting the park directly in writing. The park’s superintendent will determine whether the filming activity will require a special use permit for filming Based on the information provided, a permit may be required to:
  • maintain public health and safety;
  • protect environmental or scenic values;
  • protect natural or cultural resources;
  • allow for equitable allocation or use of facilities; or
  • avoid conflict among visitor use activities.
Some requests that may require permits: entering a sensitive resource area, filming in areas that require tickets to enter, or filming in visitor centers, campgrounds, or other visitor areas. The decision to require a permit rests with the park superintendent based on the threat to park resources, values or the visitor experience.

Contact the park directly if unsure whether or not a filming activity is considered low-impact or will require a permit.

Are filmers still required to pay fees to film in parks?
As of January 22, 2021, and under the interim guidance the National Park Service is not collecting application or location fees, or cost recovery for filming activities.

Still Photography
Price v. Barr had no impact on how the National Park Service regulates still photography, so there are no changes in how the National Park Service regulates that activity. Still photographers require a permit only when:
  • the activity takes place at location(s) where or when members of the public are generally not allowed; or
  • the activity uses model(s), sets(s), or prop(s) that are not a part of the location's natural or cultural resources or administrative facilities; or
  • a park would incur additional administrative costs to monitor the activity.
What fees will I have to pay?
The National Park Service will collect a cost recovery charge and a location fee for still photography permits. Cost recovery includes an application fee and any additional charges to cover the costs incurred by the National Park Service in processing your request and monitoring your permit. This amount will vary depending on the park and the size and complexity of your permit. The application fee must be submitted with your application.In addition, the National Park Service has been directed by Congress to collect a fee to provide a fair return to the United States for the use of park lands. The National Park Service uses the following still photography fee schedule:
  • 1–10 people - $50/day
  • 11–30 people - $150/day
  • Over 30 people - $250/day
Are there other permit requirements?
You may be required to obtain liability insurance naming the United States as additionally insured in an amount commensurate with the risk posed to park resources by your proposed activity. You may also be asked to post a bond to ensure the payment of all charges and fees and the restoration of the area if necessary.

What about photography workshops?
If you are planning a photography workshop, you may need a commercial use authorization. Click on the collapsible item below.
A commercial use is defined as any activities, services, agreements, or anything offered to park visitors and/or the general public for recreational purposes which uses park resources or is undertaken for or results in compensation, monetary gain, benefit, or profit to an individual, organization, or corporation, whether or not such entity is organized for purposes recognized as non-profit under local, state, or federal law.You are required to apply for a CUA if any of the following apply:
  • commercial transportation/tour operators and those who own, lease, charter their vehicles to other tour operators, or rent their vehicles from such places as a rental company for commercial tour purposes
  • person(s), organization, or group that arranges for the transportation and tour services, assumes responsibility for financial risk and management, and determines who shall be transported upon what terms, conditions, or charges
  • provide guided trips or services for biking, hiking, tours, or other approved activities for the public.
  • photography or painting workshops or tours

Due to the complexity associated with managing all the facets of most traditional wedding ceremonies Minute Man NHP does not generally issue permits (or allow) for traditional weddings in the park. Small ceremonies like weddings or military ceremonies with a total size of 10 people including participants and witnesses/guests, are allowed without a permit under the following conditions:
  • No “props” (including a podium, chairs, or other associated equipment or materials) are used.
  • No sound amplification equipment is used.
  • The ceremony is held in a location that it does not interfere with other park activities.
  • The ceremony is not held in the North Bridge area between Monument Street and the river nor is it held on the allee (path) anywhere including adjacent to the Minute Man Statue. (including the Bridge itself and the benches by the river).
  • The ceremony is not held in the Buttrick Garden (“Formal” Garden area adjacent to the North Bridge Visitor Center).
  • All vehicles associated with the ceremony will be parked according to law and regulation in visitor parking areas.
  • Park sponsored activities and activities for which a permit have been issued will be given priority over an area.
  • No part of the ceremony violates established rules, regulations, or laws

The North Bridge, and vicinity, is a site of national significance and has become a major focus of historical programming, contemplation and commemoration. As such, it is one the most frequently sought out locations for Special Uses at Minute Man NHP. Minute Man NHP restricts the use of the North Bridge, the area adjacent to the monuments, and the benches by the North Bridge, so as to best preserve and reserve that space for historical interpretation. Except for NPS, Town of Concord, or certain other official government activities, permits issued for Special Uses by the North Bridge, the Monuments, or the benches are issued for only “after hours” (generally 6pm or later), or rarely, very early in the morning. Exceptions to these guidelines are rarely granted due to the exceptional value the activity represents for the visitors or the park.

In most cases, a permit for any activity that is conducted in the area of the North Bridge will include a condition that NPS staff will be present during the activity in order to protect the resource and help assure that the permitted activity does not unduly interfere with visitation by the general public.

For small events, like those that do not involve the setup of equipment, the short form tor special park uses can be used. Otherwise please use the long form. If you have questions about permits or CUA’s, please email the Chief Ranger’s Office at e-mail us or call 978 318 7828 (this is a voicemail only line and is answered in the order received). Include as much detail as possible in all inquiries, AND when filling out your forms. This will help us process your permit quicker.


Submitting the below forms and any supporting documents electronically will decrease the processing time of your application and will increase your chances of getting your first-choice dates and times. Due to cyber security constraints, you must request the email address for these submissions through the e-mail us link. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

FEES: In most cases an application fee will be assessed for all permitted activities except those noted above, and for permits involving a partnership with the National Park Service. Currently, Minute Man only accepts checks (personal checks, cashier's checks, business checks). Payment must be submitted by US Mail separately and made out to the "National Park Service." Permits will be issued once that payment is received.

Application for Special Use Permit, short (form 10-930s)

Application for Special Use Permit (form 10-930)


Last updated: August 18, 2021

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Mailing Address:

North Bridge / Park Head Quarters
174 Liberty St.

Concord, MA 01742

Phone:

(978) 369-6993

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