Bald Eagles

An eagle soars over Kenai Fjords.
A Bald Eagle soars along  the coast of Kenai Fjords National Park.

Bald Eagles were once listed as an endangered species in the contiguous 48 states and considered a pest in Alaska. Populations recovered in when the bounty was removed in 1953 and harmful pesticides were banned in 1972. All Bald Eagle populations were removed from the endangered species list in 2007.

Southwest Alaska parks support large populations of Bald Eagles. Bald Eagles were once listed as an endangered species in the contiguous 48 states, but have since recovered and were delisted in 2007. As top predators, Bald Eagles can serve as indicators of the overall health of local ecosystems. Their breeding success is influenced by food availability and spring weather conditions, among other factors. Understanding the status and trends of local populations can assist park managers address concerns related to the impacts of human-caused disturbances, such as oil spills.

We are currently working to refine our objectives and develop a rigorous monitoring design that standardizes data collection and facilitates comparisons of state variables between Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park, and Lake Clark National Park and Preserve.

Contact: Tammy Wilson

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    Last updated: June 18, 2018