Landbirds

Bell's vireo perched on a branch
Bell's vireo

USFWS/Steve Maslowski

Overview

Landbirds are a conspicuous component of many ecosystems and they are a popular and highly valued resource among park visitors. Because birds are sensitive to habitat change, studying them helps us track habitat conditions. Relative to other vertebrates, landbirds are also highly detectable and can be easily surveyed.

Bird monitoring data is useful for ascertaining the overall natural condition of Chihuahuan Desert Network parks, and can provide insights into the potential consequences of stressors and current and proposed management actions.

Great horned owl with one eye closed
Great horned owl

NPS Photo

What We Monitor

  • Occupancy: presence/absence with distribution
  • Species richness and community composition
  • Annual density of the most common species

Where We Monitor

  • Amistad National Recreation Area
  • Big Bend National Park
  • Carlsbad Caverns National Park
  • Fort Davis National Historic Site
  • Guadalupe Mountains National Park
  • White Sands National Monument

Publications

Read more about our landbirds work in the resource briefs (short summaries), monitoring reports (detailed results of our work), or protocol (monitoring procedures) below.

Landbird Monitoring Resource Briefs

Source: Data Store Collection 3787. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Landbird Monitoring Reports

Source: Data Store Saved Search 1044. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Landbird Monitoring Protocol

Source: Data Store Saved Search 1042. To search for additional information, visit the Data Store.

Last updated: August 6, 2018