Virtual Tour

We're excited to offer all our visitors the opportunity to experience the battlefield no matter where you are! This Virtual Tour is led by Christopher Gwinn, Chief of Interpretation and Education at Gettysburg National Military Park. Our Virtual Tour is built around each of the sixteen Auto Tour stops and provides a comprehensive and immersive experience of the Battle of Gettysburg. Best of all, you can visit the battlefield from anywhere! Experience the battlefield from home or take us along when your visit brings you to the hallowed ground of Gettysburg itself. We hope you enjoy your Virtual Visit to the battlefield!
 
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Duration:
1 minute, 5 seconds

Start your visit to the battlefield at the Museum and Visitor Center. This includes the Gettysburg Museum of the American Civil War, the orientation film, A New Birth of Freedom, narrated by award winning actor Morgan Freeman, and the Cyclorama painting depicting Pickett's Charge.

 
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Duration:
8 minutes, 10 seconds

The Civil War is in its third year. General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate Army of Northern Virginia begin to march north where he hopes to engage the Union Army of the Potomac now under the leadership of General George Meade. Ranger Chris Gwinn describes how these two armies came to Gettysburg.

 
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Duration:
5 minutes, 32 seconds

The Battle of Gettysburg began about 8 a.m. to the west beyond the McPherson barn as Union cavalry confronted Confederate infantry advancing east along Chambersburg Pike. Heavy fighting spread north and south along this ridgeline as additional forces from both sides arrived.

 
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Duration:
4 minutes, 26 seconds

At 1 p.m. Maj. Gen. Robert E. Rodes’s Confederates attacked from this hill, threatening Union forces on McPherson and Oak ridges. Seventy- five years later, over 1,800 Civil War veterans helped dedicate this memorial to “Peace Eternal in a Nation United.”

 
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Duration:
5 minutes, 16 seconds

Union soldiers here held stubbornly against Rodes’s advance. By 3:30 p.m., however, the entire Union line from here to McPherson Ridge had begun to crumble, finally falling back to Cemetery Hill.

 
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Duration:
3 minutes, 34 seconds

Early in the day, the Confederate army positioned itself on high ground here along  Seminary Ridge, through town, and north of Cemetery and Culp’s hills. Union forces occupied Culp’s and Cemetery hills, and along Cemetery Ridge south to the Round Tops. The lines of both armies formed two parallel “fishhooks.”

 
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Duration:
5 minutes, 37 seconds

The large open field to the east is where the last Confederate assault of the battle, known as “Pickett’s Charge,” occurred July 3.

 
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Duration:
2 minutes, 21 seconds

In the afternoon of July 2, Lt. Gen. James Longstreet placed his Confederate troops along Warfield Ridge, anchoring the left of his line in these woods.

 
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Duration:
2 minutes, 37 seconds

Longstreet’s assaults began here at 4 p.m. They were directed against Union troops occupying Devil’s Den, the Wheatfield, and Peach Orchard, and against Meade’s undefended left flank at the Round Tops.

 
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Duration:
8 minutes, 34 seconds

Quick action by Brig. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, Meade’s chief engineer, alerted Union officers to the Confederate threat and brought Federal reinforcements to defend this position.

 
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Duration:
1 minute, 46 seconds

Charge and countercharge left this field and the nearby woods strewn with over 4,000 dead and wounded.

 
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Duration:
1 minute, 48 seconds

The Union line extended from Devil’s Den to here, then angled northward on Emmitsburg Road. Federal cannon bombarded Southern forces crossing the Rose Farm toward the Wheatfield until about 6:30 p.m., when Confederate attacks overran this position.

 
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Duration:
1 minute, 43 seconds

While fighting raged to the south at the Wheatfield and Little Round Top, retreating Union soldiers crossed this ground on their way from the Peach Orchard to Cemetery Ridge.

 
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Duration:
2 minutes, 37 seconds

Union artillery held the line alone here on Cemetery Ridge late in the day as Meade called for infantry from Culp’s Hill and other areas to strengthen and hold the center of the Union position.

 
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Duration:
2 minutes, 31 seconds

About 7 p.m., Confederates attacked the right flank of the Union army and occupied the lower slopes of Culp’s Hill. The next morning the Confederates were driven off after seven hours of fighting.

 
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Duration:
1 minute, 42 seconds

At dusk, Union forces repelled a Confederate assault that reached the crest of this hill.

 
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Duration:
9 minutes, 43 seconds

Late in the afternoon, after a two-hour cannonade, some 7,000 Union soldiers posted around the Copse of Trees, The Angle, and the Brian Barn, repulsed the bulk of the 12,000-man “Pickett’s Charge” against the Federal center. This was the climactic moment of the battle. On July 4, Lee’s army began retreating.

 
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Duration:
8 minutes, 5 seconds

This was the setting for Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, delivered at the cemetery’s dedication on November 19, 1863.

 

Credits


Stop 1a
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Washington Greys" by 8th Regiment Band

Stop 1b
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (C.S.A.) by Fifth Michigan Regimental Band

Stop 2
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "John Brown Medley" by Susquehanna Travelers

Stop 3
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Dixie" and "Bonnie Blue Flag" (C.S.A.) by Fifth Michigan Regimental Band

Stop 4
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "The Cumberland March" by Fifth Michigan Regimental Band

Stop 5
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Washington Greys' by 8th Regimental Band

Stop 6
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Soldier's Joy" by Fort McHenry Guard Fife and Drum Corps

Stop 7
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Webster's Funeral March" by 8 Regimental Band

Stop 8
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Webster's Funeral March" by 8 Regimental Band and "Yankee Doodle" by Fifth Michigan Regimental Band

Stop 9
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Soldier's Joy" by Fort McHenry Guard Fife and Drum Corps

Stop 10
Maps by Hal Jespersen

Stop 11
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "The Girl I Left Behind Me" by Fort McHenry Guard Fife and Drum Corps

Stop 12
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Cashtown Road" by Susquehanna Travelers

Stop 13
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Dixie" and "Bonnie Blue Flag" (C.S.A.) by Fifth Michigan Regimental Band

Stop 14
Maps by Hal Jespersen

Stop 15
Maps by Hal Jespersen

Stop 16
Maps by Hal Jespersen
Music: "Webster's Funeral March" and "Home Again" by 8th Regimental Band

Last updated: July 20, 2020

Contact the Park

Mailing Address:

1195 Baltimore Pike
Gettysburg, PA 17325

Phone:

(717) 334-1124

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