Article

Article Series

Series: Maud Malone - New York City Librarian and Suffrage Powerhouse

Series by Dan Meharg. The fight to win voting rights for American women began in 1848, but by 1905 the effort was about dead. The movement’s founders were passing away and only four western states allowed women to vote. Maud Malone, a New York City librarian, was determined to revive the dying movement. Single working women like herself paid taxes but had no say in how that money was spent. America prided itself on being a free country but...

  • Chapter 1: Maud Malone: Suffrage Pioneer

    Maud Malone addresses a crowd in New York City. LOC

    The fight to win voting rights for American women began in 1848, but by 1905 the effort was about dead. The movement’s founders were passing away and only four western states allowed women to vote. Maud Malone, a New York City librarian, was determined to revive the dying movement. Read more

  • Chapter 2: Maud Malone: Inspiration

    Maud Malone

    Maud’s fifteen year battle for women’s voting rights, also called women’s suffrage, occurred when she was between the ages of 32 and 47. Her methods were non-violent, but often involved physical altercations, and her athleticism likely spared her a serious injury in the many altercations she experienced. Read more

  • Chapter 3: Maud Malone: Open Air Suffrage Meetings

    Bettina Borrmann Wells

    In the spring of 1907, Maud convinced her fellow members of the Harlem Equal Rights League to adopt one non-violent aspect of the radical English suffragettes: open-air meetings on street corners. Read more

  • Chapter 4: Maud Malone: The New York City Suffrage Parade of 1908

    Suffrage Parade, NYC. LOC

    With more and more women deciding to participate in open-air meetings, Maud Malone decided to hold a parade in February 1908. Maud was always willing to be brave enough to go first. Again she invited women club members to join her. Read more

  • Chapter 5: Maud Malone: Epilogue and Legacy

    1915 suffrage parade NYC. LOC

    And what became of Maud? After 1908, Maud continued to push the boundaries of public opinion on gender roles and political tactics. At public meetings, on the street and even in restaurants, Maud would wear a fabric sandwich board-like sign running from shoulder to waist, demanding votes for women. Read more

  • Chapter 6: Maud Malone: Places Associated with Her Story

    Suffragists at Grant's Tomb, LOC

    For those interested in visiting some of the sites where Maud Malone helped to reinvigorate the suffrage movement, there are a number of National Park Sites and New York City locations where one can stand where Maud once stood. Read more

  • Chapter 7: Maud Malone: Bibliography & Acknowledgements

    Maud Malone

    Bibliography and Acknowledgements for the Maud Malone Article Series. Read more