Men and women in period costumes hold lanterns at night.
Patriots' Day annual celebration.

NPS photo

Patriots’ Day, a unique Massachusetts event, marks the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord that touched off a revolution. Minute Man National Historical Park scheduled numerous events over three consecutive weekends, which together are known as “Patriots’ Weekend.” Along with National Park Week, Patriots’ Weekend kicks off the park season.

Men and women in period costumes in a band and on stage.
Celebrating running battle at Meriam's Corners.

NPS photo

On April 8, the town of Concord celebrated the beginning of the running battle at Meriam’s Corners on the east side of town. A morning parade, followed by a salute by the Concord Minutemen and an open house at the Meriam house, started the “long weekend.” Later in the afternoon, the town of Lincoln coordinated the observance of Paul Revere’s capture along the park’s Battle Road. This year, a theater in the field brought back to life those involved in the creation of “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere” near where Revere was captured.
Six National Guard members walking along dirt path.
National Guard members.

NPS photo

“Tough Ruck” took place April 15. Over one thousand National Guard members ran and walked 26.2 miles, emulating the distance of the Boston Marathon from the North Bridge and along the Battle Road Battlefield. Members of Captain David Brown's Company presented a volley musket fire to the participants as they crossed over North Bridge to begin their annual ruck, which is sanctioned by the Boston Athletic Association as an official marathon event.

Living history activities continued at Hartwell Tavern, Smith House and the Whittemore House. The three key features along the Battle Road were staffed by members of the Lincoln Minute Men, Guild of Historic Interpreters and park volunteers who turned out to interpret life in the 1770s to visitors. Minute Man Visitor Center was the center of activity. More than 100 new junior rangers was sworn in throughout Junior Ranger Day. The First Michigan Volunteers were on hand to perform colonial music to visitors waiting for the afternoon tactical demonstration at the Parker’s Revenge area along Battle Road.

Reenactors dressed as Red Coats, fire a gun.
Living history on Battle Road.

NPS photo

At 2:00 pm, more than 100 volunteer reenactors took to the field as colonial minutemen and British Army regulars. The tactical demonstration presented visitors with the sights and sounds of what this area of the park, a third mile of the Battle Road battlefield, may have been like for all involved.

On Easter Sunday, the popular program “Revolutionary Dogs: Paws for the Cause” brought dog owners out for a fun look at dogs, history and some canine socializing. Later, that afternoon, the Barrett Farm was open for interested visitors to view the house. Hundreds of visitors took the opportunity to view the house which is, presently, only open for special events.

Male ranger holds up photo for visitors.
Ranger Roger talking about "Revolutionary Dogs: Paws for the Cause".

NPS photo

April 19—the anniversary of the beginning of armed conflict between the British Army and colonial militias, began with a morning salute by the Concord Minutemen and Concord Independent Battery, who fired 21 guns for reflection and commemoration of the event. The Molly Cutthroats, a group of women reenactors presented “Remembering the Ladies” [a play or skit? A presentation? A lecture?] which honored the contributions of women on April 19, 1775. The Sudbury Militia arrived on schedule at North Bridge about 11:30 am and fired a salute.

A wooden bridge stretches across the water while reenactors fire guns.
Sudbury Militia on North Bridge.

NPS photo

On Saturday, April 22, the Guild of Historic Interpreters presented their semi-annual evening of theater and history. “Battle Road Heroes” is a special evening performance that presented the stories of those who lived and were involved in the events of 1775.
Women in period costumes fire guns while standing on wooden bridge.
Molly Cutthroats on North Bridge.

NPS photo

To successfully present so many events held during April, Minute Man National Historical Park depends upon hundreds of volunteers who come together in the planning and execution of the events without duplicating efforts over the three consecutive Saturdays. Support from area NPS sites, plus area police and fire personnel, U.S. Fish and Wildlife rangers and State Police, allowed more than 10,000 visitors a chance to find their park.