• Rainbow over Half Dome

    Yosemite

    National Park California

Hiking Safety

Stay Safe!
Over 800 miles of trails traverse Yosemite National Park. Not surprisingly, the majority of Yosemite's Search and Rescue (YOSAR) missions are spent assisting injured hikers or searching for a lost people in the wilderness. Each year, park rangers and search and rescue personnel respond to approximately 250 emergency incidents in the park.

Here are some quick tips to help you be safe while hiking in Yosemite:
  • Carry a headlamp on every hike, even short day hikes
  • Carry and drink plenty of water (a minimum of 1 quart every 2 hours)
  • Sturdy footwear with good traction might save an ankle
  • Minor/moderate health or medical issues can be easily exacerbated by hiking up the steep Valley trails—know your limits and pay attention to how you're feeling
  • Stay on the established trail
  • When hiking in a group, each member of the group should carry some water and food in case the party becomes separated, and the group should make a plan for where to meet up (at the vehicle, at the trailhead, etc.) if the members become separated.
 

Over 800 miles of trails traverse Yosemite. Not surprisingly, the majority of Yosemite's Search and Rescue (YOSAR) missions are spent assisting injured hikers or searching for a lost people in the backcountry. Here are some quick tips to help you HIKE SAFE in Yosemite National Park.

Have a plan
Inform someone of where you're going and
when you plan to return
Keep a flashlight and whistle with you
Eat well, stay hydrated: carry plenty of water

Stay on the trail
Ask for HELP!
Familiarize yourself with the area, use a map
Expect changes in the weather

For more information, the Friends of Yosemite Search and Rescue's provides more information about the potential dangers and how to be safe while on the trail.

 
 
Trail to North Peak near Yosemite's northwestern boundary
Trail to North Peak, near Yosemite's northwestern boundary
NPS Photo by Adrienne Freeman

Did You Know?

Cars and campers in a meadow in Yosemite Valley.

Unrestricted camping is no longer allowed in Yosemite Valley because of damage it causes. The placement of campgrounds and campsites has changed over the past 75 years in response to a growing understanding of river dynamics, geologic hazards, and the park's natural and cultural resources.