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    Yosemite

    National Park California

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  • Road Closures Due to El Portal Fire

    The Big Oak Flat Road between Crane Flat and the El Portal Road is temporarily closed. There is no access to Yosemite Valley via the Big Oak Flat Road or Highway 120. Tioga Road is open and accessible via Big Oak Flat and Tioga Pass Entrances. More »

  • Campground Closures Due to Fire

    Crane Flat, Bridalveil Creek, and Yosemite Creek Campgrounds are temporarily closed. More »

  • Yosemite National Park is Open

    Yosemite Valley, Glacier Point, and Wawona/Mariposa Grove areas are open and accessible via Highways 140 and 41. Tioga Road is not accessible via Highways 140 and 41 due to a fire.

33 Years of Deaf Services

August 23, 2012 Posted by: Jessica Cole

Have you ever wondered how Yosemite Deaf Services got started? We've been around for 33 years! Back in 1977, a Deaf visitor and his partner met Ranger Len McKenzie, whose grandmother had gone deaf when he was a boy, and Donna Prichett, the Accessibility Coordinator for Yosemite at the time.  The following summer those two visitors, Dale Dahl and Maureen Fitzgerald, volunteered to work on accessibility for Deaf visitors to Yosemite in exchange for a campsite for one month.  Maureen became an employee the summer of 1980. Dale Dahl and Mary Ellen Lentz provided consultation to get the program going and make it as effective as possible. We've had at least one interpreter in the park every summer since then, and sometimes during the off-season too. You can read the whole story at http://www.berkeleycitycollege.edu/wp/asl/files/2010/09/summer10c.pdf [1.2 MB PDF].


2 Comments Comments Icon

  1. daniel - framingham, massachsettet
    April 14, 2014 at 12:03

    im deaf im very happy for you

  2. Hana - Los Angeles, CA
    February 26, 2014 at 08:15

    This is so great to hear! I wonder if a lot of parks have a program like this! I think deaf services is so important to have available at national parks!

 

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Did You Know?

Vernal and Nevada Falls

In Yosemite Valley, dropping over 594-foot Nevada Fall and then 317-foot Vernal Fall, the Merced River creates what is known as the “Giant Staircase.” Such exemplary stair-step river morphology is characterized by a large variability in river movement and flow, from quiet pools to the dramatic drops of the waterfalls themselves.