Places

A view from on top of a hill overlooking a train depot, pond, stone arch, and mountains

Many places in Yellowstone have been preserved because of the information they convey about past human activities in the region or because of their significance in architectural or park history. Frank J. Haynes photographed many of these places. The "Gardiner Depot & Yellowstone Stone Arch" is shown here.

NPS/YELL 11311

 

The places people create in the natural world are known as cultural landscapes. In Yellowstone, these landscapes reflect the park’s history and changing relationship between people and the environment.

Many places in Yellowstone have been preserved because of the information they convey about past human activities in the region or because of their significance in architectural or park history. Historic structures and sites in Yellowstone contribute to the park's record of the early and on-going efforts to balance resource preservation and facility development for public enjoyment.

 

More Information

  • Cultural Landscapes: A cultural landscape is an indicator of cultural patterns, values, and heritage through the way the land is organized and divided, patterns of settlement, land use, circulation, and the types of structures that are built and their placement in the landscape.
  • Preserving Historic Structures and Districts: Historic structures and the historical character of the park are carefully considered in park planning.
  • Park History: Learn about Yellowstone's story from the earliest humans to today's modern management.

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