• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Places To Go

Cave Tour Assembly Room

Cave Tour in the Assembly Room in Wind Cave

NPS Photo by Mike Landrum

Tour schedules very throughout the year. Please check the program schedule to see what tours are being offered at the time of your visit.

Natural Entrance Cave Tour
Visitors walk through the middle level of the cave where Wind Cave's rare formation, called boxwork, is abundant. This tour begins at the walk-in entrance near the cave's only known natural entrance and exits by elevator. This moderately strenuous, 1¼ hour tour has 300 stairs (mostly down).

Fairgrounds Cave Tour
This tour includes some of the larger rooms found in the developed area of the cave. Visitors will see examples of many cave formations, including Wind Cave boxwork and cave popcorn. The tour enters and exits the cave by elevator. This moderately strenuous tour has 450 stairs and last 1½ hours.

Garden of Eden Cave Tour
Representative features of Wind Cave are seen on this trip through the upper level of the cave. Cave popcorn, flowstone, and boxwork are seen on this one hour tour. It is our least strenuous with 150 stairs along the route and enters and leaves the cave by elevator.

 
Tiffiny Durham and visitors on Candlelight Tour

Tiffiny Durham and visitors on Candlelight Tour

NPS Photo by Sheena Harper

Candlelight Cave Tour
Experience the cave by candlelight. This tour takes place in a less developed, unlighted part of the cave. Each participant will carry a candle bucket. Shoes with non-slip soles are required. No sandals! This tour is limited to 10 people and the minimum age is 8. This strenuous tour covers one mile of rugged trail and lasts 2 hours. Reservations are strongly recommended. Reservations may only be made in person or by telephone - (605) 745-4600.
 
Karen Henker on Wild Cave Tour

Karen Henker on Wild Cave Tour

NPS Photo

Wild Cave Tour
Explore the cave away from the developed trails. On this 4-hour tour visitors will be introduced to basic, safe caving. Wear old clothes and gloves, as much of the trip will be crawling. Long pants, long sleeved shirts and sturdy, lace up boots or shoes with non-slip soles are required. The park provides hard hats, lights and kneepads. Please do not bring jewelry, watches and other valuables on the tour. This tour is limited to 10 people and the minimum age is 16. We require a signed consent form for those 17 and under. Reservations are required. Reservations may only be made in person or by telephone - (605) 745-4600.
 

Discovery Activity
Join a ranger for a short talk or demonstration explaining some facet of the park. Topics may include local wildlife, plants, geology, area history, Lakota culture and cave surveying. Check at the visitor center for meeting place and topic.

Prairie Hike
Explore the park's prairie and forest habitats with a ranger. This 2-hour activity will meet at the visitor center and then drive to a nearby trailhead. Hiking boots and study shoes and water are advised. Check at the visitor center for details.

Campfire Program
Become better acquainted with Wind Cave National Park. Evening campfire talks are presented at the Elk Mountain Campground amphitheater. Topics may include wildlife, plants, geology, park management and history. Nightly program titles are posted at the visitor center. The programs last about 45 minutes.

 
Special Cave Tour

Special Cave Tour

NPS Photo by Jim Pisarowicz

Cave Tours for Visitors with Special Needs
The visitor center and the cave are accessible to people with limited mobility. Limited areas of the cave are accessible to wheelchairs. To schedule a special tour, please call ahead (605-745-4600) or check at the information desk. There are fees charged for these services. For more information, call the park at 605-745-4600.

Wind Cave for the Hearing Impaired

Program Schedule

Map of Cave Tour Routes

Experience Wind Cave National Park through this video Wind Cave National Park 1903-2003 Video Real Video
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Did You Know?

Bull Elk

Elk were the most widely distributed member of the deer family in North America and spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Mexico to northern Alberta. Elk began to disappear in the eastern United States in the early 1800s. More...