• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • Skyline Drive Status

    For the most current Skyline Drive Status, call 540-999-3500, choose Option 1, and then Option 1. Be prepared for winter driving conditions when the Drive is open! You can also use Facebook and Twitter for updates. More »

Volunteer

Volunteers-in-Parks logo

Volunteers-in-Parks

Learn new skills! Gain work experience! Meet new people! Explore your national park!
Join the community of volunteers nationwide who donate their time and talent to our national parks. Come share in Shenandoah National Park's mission of resource protection and visitor services.

Program Overview
Shenandoah National Park provides a variety of volunteer opportunities. These range from clerical, skilled and unskilled maintenance, trail crews, campground support, natural resources data collection, exotic plant removal, as well as visitor contact on walking trails or at visitor centers. The majority of opportunities are available April through November, but some may be available through the year. Opportunities are be available for individuals as well as groups.

How to get started
Participating in the Volunteer-in-Parks program is a rewarding way to explore and contribute to your national parks! You can download an application here, and email it or mail it to:

Shenandoah National Park
Volunteer & Youth Programs Coordinator
3655 U.S. Hwy 211 East
Luray, VA 22835-4702

Thank you for your interest in Shenandoah National Park, we look forward to hearing from you soon!

 

Current Volunteer Opportunities

 
A Shenandoah Volunteer cutting invasive plants at Rapidan Camp.
Volunteer assisting with invasive plant species management at Rapidan Camp.
NPS Photo
 
 

Did You Know?

Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover sitting on the porch of the Brown House at Rapidan Camp in Shenandoah National Park.

In 1928, wanting to escape the heat and humidity of summers in Washington, D.C., Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover began looking for a "summer place" within a day's drive of the city. The Hoovers acquired land within the proposed Shenandoah National Park and built Rapidan Camp, their summer White House.