• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

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  • No credit cards currently being accepted onsite at Loft Mountain Campground

    Due to technical difficulties, credit cards are not being accepted at Loft Mountain Campground as of 7/25/2014.

Horseback Trail Rides

 

Here are some suggested trail ride routes including parking areas, riding directions, and mileages. The "Winter" column indicates if a particular route is suitable for riding in wet weather or winter conditions. There are two Route Types: Roundtrip rides proceed to a destination and return by the same route. Circuit rides begin and end at the same point without retracing steps. Enjoy your ride!

Suggested Trail Rides
Distance (miles) Winter Title Description Type
01-09 Yes Keyser Run Roundtrip Riding this gated gravel road takes you past a walled cemetery and former homesites. Roundtrip
01-09 Yes Old Rag/Weakley Hollow Fire Roads Roundtrip Ride to historic Post Office Junction, with optional side trip to Upper Whiteoak Waterfall. Roundtrip
01-09 No Heiskell Hollow and Beecher Ridge Enjoy wilderness solitude on narrow woodland trails. Circuit
01-09 No South River and Pocosin Roundtrip Visit the third highest waterfall in the park and see the Pocosin Mission ruins. Roundtrip
01-15 Yes Browns Gap Roundtrip From this gap, ride in either direction on a gravel road that was an 1806 turnpike. Roundtrip
01-15 No Madison Run and Big Run Portal A rugged ride to the beautiful Big Run wilderness valley, largest watershed in the park. Roundtrip
01-15 Yes Rose River Roundtrip Even your horse can see a waterfall from this gravel road formerly known as the Gordonsville Pike. Roundtrip
01-20 Yes Rapidan Roundtrip This 10-mile (one-way) gravel road wends its way in and out of the Park on public lands. Roundtrip
01-20 No North Fork Moormans River (and Paine Run option) Criss-cross the spectacular North Fork Moormans River with its abundant, popular swimming holes. Roundtrip
01-30 No Rapidan and Rose River Loops A variety of circuits (from 8 to 28 miles long) make be ridden in this area. Circuit
01-30 Yes South Fork Moormans River Roundtrip Ride this quiet road from Jarman Gap to the Sugar Hollow Reservior. Roundtrip
10-15 No Rose River, Stony Man, and Upper Dark Hollow Dark Hollow Falls, slow roller coaster ride up and down through the mountains. Circuit
10-15 No Thornton River and Piney Branch via Hull School Pass former home (and school) sites and splash through mountain streams. Circuit
10-15 No Thornton River and Piney Branch via Keyser Run Starting on gravel and moving to the woods, you will never be far from mountain streams. Circuit
10-20 No Mt. Marshall, Bluff, and Harris Hollow Travel a mostly wilderness route while in the park. Quiet county roads make this trip a circuit. Circuit
15-20 No South River and Pocosin Circuit Visit the third highest waterfall in the park and see the Pocosin Mission ruins. Circuit
15-20 Yes Simmons Gap Semi-Circuit Start in the park, then ride county roads through Sugar Grove and Bacon Hollow. Circuit
15-20 No Hazel Country Semi-Circuit Explore the wilderness while riding past former homesites and farms. Circuit
15-20 No Jenkins Gap, Browntown, Bluff, and Mt. Marshall Wilderness trails, timeworn byways, and quiet county roads lend variety to these circuits. Circuit
15-20 No Fork Mountain and Rapidan River These excellent circuits include historic Rapidan Camp, mountain climbs, and river fords. Circuit
25-35 No Old Rag and Rose River Loop Get up early and ride all day (approximately 30 miles) through spectacular scenery. Circuit


Remember to purchase a topographic map for the area where you plan to ride. These maps also show Skyline Drive, overlooks, mile markers, and county roads to assist you in driving to your destination. If you are considering starting at the boundary in an unfamiliar area, click for boundary access information.

Did You Know?

Two deer stand in the tall grass in Big Meadows.

The first visitors to Shenandoah National Park during the 1930s and early 40s rarely saw deer. They were gradually restocked from four other states.