Curriculum Materials

Most of the curriculum materials listed here are for the curriculum-based field trip programs offered in the park.The Good Character, Good Stewards lessons are designed for teachers to use in their classrooms and school. Interactive, internet-based lessons can be found on the Distance Learning page.

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Showing results 1-10 of 11

  • Shenandoah National Park

    Good Character, Good Stewards

    Students and the world around them.

    What does "stewardship" mean? How can we, as children now and all adults, care for our environment around us?  How can we can we care for the wildlife, plants, people, and nature around us?

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Upper Elementary: Third Grade through Fifth Grade
    Subjects:
    Literacy and Language Arts,Science
  • Two kids hold up a large picture of a shenandoah salamander next to a park ranger who holds up an arrowhead, the symbol of the National Park Service.

    Shenandoah National Park is a refuge for many animals and plants that are pressured by human activities and other land uses. Shenandoah is home for the Shenandoah salamander, an endangered species that lives nowhere else on the planet. Human-accelerated climate change could cause a serious decline in population of the Shenandoah salamander. Students will learn about environmental threats and determine ways people can help protect species and care for their national parks and the environment.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fourth Grade
    Subjects:
    Climate Change, Conservation, Environment, Wildlife Biology
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Habitats of Shenandoah

    Ranger showing kids a habitat

    A habitat is a specific place where plants and animals live. A complete habitat must provide the basic needs, both living and nonliving, for the survival of its inhabitants. Within each habitat, there are many complex relationships as residents strive to meet their needs. Shenandoah National Park offers the opportunity for students to discover and explore nature as they apply and expand concepts and knowledge learned in the classroom.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Second Grade
    Subjects:
    Botany, Conservation, Earth Science
  • A park ranger holds up a photo while a child holds up another picture beside her.

    Shenandoah National Park is an important natural and cultural resource in Virginia’s Blue Ridge geographic region. Students in the 9 Virginia counties that border this long and narrow national park will discover those resources and the National Park Service mission with ranger-led in-class activities such as modeling park careers, analyzing artifacts, investigating geologic samples, and writing creative responses while gaining classroom knowledge about Virginia’s history, geology and geography.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fifth Grade
    Subjects:
    Conservation, Geography, Geology, History
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Come to Your Senses

    A kindergarten student taking a close up look at a plant in Shenandoah.

    A child investigates the world and learns about his/her surroundings through the five senses. Shenandoah National Park, with its abundance of flora and fauna, diversity of habitats, and variety of animals is a great place to expand a child’s sense of wonder and develop observation skills through hands-on discovery and nature experiences. Students will learn stewardship behaviors and find ways they can help protect and preserve the environment.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Kindergarten
    Subjects:
    Botany, Earth Science, Ecology
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah Residents

    Ranger showing kids a plant

    Plants and animals live all around us and each one has the same life needs. Students will explore Shenandoah National Park to discover the different plants and animals that live in the park. Students will investigate how, where and why plants and animals meet their life needs in their respective environments and how Shenandoah National Park provides protection for plants and animals.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    First Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Biology: Plants, Conservation, Wilderness
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Exploring Earth Science

    Llittle Stony Man Cliffs

    Exploring Earth Science in Shenandoah National Park provides middle and high school teachers with the support materials and training necessary to use Shenandoah National Park to instruct earth science and geology. Teachers must attend an instructional workshop to receive the materials and training.

    Type:
    Curricula
    Grade level:
    Seventh Grade-Twelfth Grade
    Subjects:
    Earth Science, Geology, Wilderness
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Watersheds

    Watersheds

    Fresh water is a precious, non-renewable resource that is essential for life. People depend on it for drinking, transportation, livelihoods, and recreation. Water also provides habitat for many plants and animals. The manner in which this resource is protected has a direct impact upon the natural and human communities. Shenandoah National Park lies at the headwaters for three of Virginia’s watersheds.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Sixth Grade
    Subjects:
    Aquatic Studies, Conservation, Earth Science, Wildlife Management
    Keywords:
    Conservation, health, watersheds, Grade 6
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Good Character, Good Stewards

    Images of children and Earth - the Good Character, Good Stewards cover graphic

    This interdisciplinary curriculum supplement for grades K-6 integrates character education with science, math, language arts, and social science lessons for the classroom. The activities focus on the concept of stewardship and the ideals of the National Park Service to provide relevant educational experiences that involve students and promote an understanding of their responsibility to care for the world and its resources.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Kindergarten-Sixth Grade
    Subjects:
    Conservation, Geology, Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies
  • Shenandoah National Park

    Ecosystems: The World-wide Web of Life

    Ecosystems: The World-wide Web of Life

    The world is composed of many natural ecosystems in which plants and animals interact with one another and the nonliving environment. Each species has a niche or job within the ecosystem and each is dependent on the other members of its community for survival. Students will explore the natural communities found in Shenandoah National Park and make comparisons between natural and human communities.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fourth Grade
    Subjects:
    Conservation, Earth Science, Wildlife Biology
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