• Photo of park visitors enjoying sunset from the Alpine Ridge Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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  • Impacts from September 2013 Flood - Old Fall River Road, Alluvial Fan and Trails

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Support Your Park

There are many ways to support Rocky Mountain National Park and the National Park Service.

Become a Volunteer

You can make an important contribution to Rocky Mountain National Park and our community by volunteering. With 1700 volunteers contributing over 105,000 hours, Rocky Mountain has one of the most diverse and active volunteer programs in the National Park Service. Volunteers support all aspects of park operations including visitor services, trails, wildlife education, resource stewardship and maintenance.

How to Donate-Rocky Mountain Nature Association

The Rocky Mountain Nature Association, the park's cooperating association raises money for significant long-term improvement projects within Rocky Mountain National Park including land acquisition, capital construction, restoration and preservation of historic structures, development of educational exhibits, construction of trails and development of wheelchair accessible pathways.

 

Please Protect Rocky's Precious Park and Wilderness Resources

Park trails lead into wilderness and park roads to special places. They are places where wild plants and animals live out their daily lives and where natural processes prevail; They are also areas for people to be spiritually refreshed and physically challenged. They are areas to enjoy. From our visits we gain rich experiences and memories, but in return we must remember to give these areas another day of unspoiled wildness.

 
Image of Leave No  Trace icon
  • Plan ahead and prepare.
  • Be considerate of other visitors.
  • Travel and camp on durable surfaces.
  • Respect wildlife.
  • Dispose of waste properly.
  • Minimize campfire Impacts.
  • Leave what you find


 

Did You Know?

a photo of treeline in Rocky Mountain National Park

If the current amount of total nitrogen deposition measured at the high-elevation monitoring site in Rocky Mountain National Park (3 kg/ha/yr) was the same throughout the park, the amount of airborne nitrogen entering the park would be equivalent to 35,500 twenty-pound bags of fertilizer. More...