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Second Public Meeting Scheduled on Potential Multiuse Trail System

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Date: July 29, 2013
Contact: Kyle Patterson, (970) 586-1363

Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) is preparing a Multiuse Trail Plan with an accompanying Environmental Assessment (EA). RMNP completed a Multiuse Trail Feasibility Study in 2009, for the developed eastern portion of the park. This study confirmed the feasibility of a trail system that would extend approximately 15.5 miles from the Fall River Entrance to Sprague Lake, with potential connections to three visitor centers, three campgrounds, and numerous hiker shuttle stops. The National Park Service is continuing the planning process with the development of a Multiuse Trail Plan/EA, which will examine possible options for multiuse trail alignments and analyze potential environmental impacts.       

A public meeting earlier this year (February 19, 2013) introduced the background of this project as well as the purpose of and need for the trail system. Based on the public comments received following that meeting, the 2009 feasibility study, and further field reconnaissance, two potential alternative trail alignments have been identified, along with an alternative that would maintain the status quo. The upcoming meeting will provide the public with a project update and an opportunity to comment on the alternatives developed thus far.      

This second public scoping meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 6, 2013, from 4:45 PM to 6:15 PM at the Estes Park Museum, located at 200 4th Street, Estes Park, Colorado. There will be a short presentation at 5:00 p.m., and park staff and the consultant will be available to answer questions until 6:15 p.m.; however, the public is invited to visit at any point during the scheduled time to review materials and provide written comments.    More details about the project can be found on the National Park Service (NPS) Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) website at: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/romo

From the home page select "Multi-Use Trail Environmental Assessment." The park is inviting written public comments regarding potential issues and concerns that should be considered during the planning process, and comments can be entered directly on the website listed above. Written comments are requested by the end of the public scoping period on Friday, August 23, 2013.      

Although the preferred method to submit comments is through the PEPC website, written comments may be submitted in several ways:

-   Comment forms will be available at the public meeting and can be given to park staff at the meeting or mailed later.

-   By mail: Superintendent, Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, CO 80517

-   By fax: (970) 586-1397

-   By email: e-mail us

-   Hand-deliver: Rocky Mountain National Park Headquarters, 1000 Highway 36, Estes Park, Colorado.       

Before including an address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment including your personal identifying information may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.      

Once the scoping period concludes, all comments submitted will be considered. There will be an additional opportunity to comment on the Plan/EA when it is released for public review and comment in late spring 2014.      

For further information about Rocky Mountain National Park, please call the park's Information Office at (970)586-1206.   

Did You Know?

a photo of a spider web

Hummingbirds use spiderwebs to bolster their nests, which are the size of a walnut shell. Hummingbird eggs are the size of a Tic-Tac breath mint.