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    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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Old Fall River Road In Rocky Mountain National Park Open For The 2011 Season

Photo Snow plowing on Old Fall River Road on July 27, 2011
Park road crew plowing snow at the top of Old Fall River Road on Wednesday, July 27, 2011.
NPS Photo

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News Release Date: July 30, 2011
Contact: Kyle Patterson, 970-586-1363

Old Fall River Road in Rocky Mountain National Park opened this morning for the season. Old Fall River Road normally opens by the Fourth of July holiday weekend but due to the heaviest late spring snow seen in decades the opening was delayed. There are no good long term records of the opening dates of Old Fall River Road prior to 1985. This is the latest the road has opened in 26 years.

Old Fall River Road was built between 1913 and 1920. It is an unpaved road which travels from Endovalley Picnic Area to above treeline at Fall River Pass, following the steep slope of Mount Chapin’s south face. Due to the winding, narrow nature of the road, the scenic 9.4-mile route leading to Trail Ridge Road is one-way only. Vehicles over 25 feet and vehicles pulling trailers are prohibited on the road. Visitors should expect dust on the road and muddy conditions at the top near Alpine Visitor Center.

 
Photo Snow plowing on Old Fall River Road on July 27, 2011

NPS Photo

Although Old Fall River Road normally closes in early to mid-October, the road will likely close earlier this year sometime in September, due to maintenance work that still needs to be completed prior to this winter.

For more information about Rocky Mountain National Park, please call the park’s Information Office at (970) 586-1206.

Did You Know?

a photo of gneiss (a metamorphic rock)

The oldest rocks in the park are metamorphic (biotite schist and gneiss) estimated at 1.7 billion years old, making them some of the oldest rocks within the National Park System.