• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Volunteer: Stream Team

Overview
To assist park staff in improving fish habitat for federally listed coho salmon and steelhead trout through streamside restoration.

Duties

  • Plant native plants
  • Construct, remove and maintain fences along creek habitat
  • Remove non-native plants
  • Perform habitat monitoring

Skills, knowledge, experience

Ability to perform moderate physical labor

Special requirements

  • Work may involve hiking over uneven terrain, bending, pulling, and lifting.
  • Proper field attire is required (close-toed shoes, long pants, and layers) as work may involve exposure to poison oak, ticks, temperature extremes, wind, rain, and fog.

Schedule and Time Commitment
Stream Team work days are generally scheduled from November through March. Work days last four hours from 10:00 am until 2:00 pm.

The Stream Team is a drop-in program where volunteers are not required to work more than one day at a time. However, volunteers are welcome to work as many of the Stream Team days as desired.

Currently scheduled workdays include:

  • Saturday, March 15, 2014 (see flyer (996 KB PDF) or contact Brentley McNeill below for details)

Please contact us (see below) to confirm workdays.

Training
Training on the safe and proper use of tools will be provided on-the-job.

Benefits to the Volunteer

  • Satisfaction in helping to enhance habitat for federally endangered and threatened species of coho salmon and steelhead trout
  • Knowledge of habitat restoration techniques

Group Type
Individuals and groups up to 15 people are welcome. Larger groups may schedule work days for the alternate Saturdays of the month.

Minimum Age
All ages 6 and above are encouraged to attend, however, children under 14 will need adult supervision. Volunteers under 18 must have a signed parental consent form. Please contact us (see below) for more information.

Accommodations
Housing and RV sites are unavailable.

Application and Contact Information
Please apply using the link below. You may also confirm your participation or request more information by contacting either Madeline Cooper by email or Brentley McNeill by email or both at (415) 464-5206.

 

Did You Know?

Tule Elk

In the mid-1800s, the tule elk was hunted to the brink of extinction. The last surviving tule elk were discovered and protected in the southern San Joaquin Valley in 1874. In 1978, ten tule elk were reintroduced to Point Reyes, which now has one of California's largest populations, numbering ~500. More...