• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Critical Culvert Repair will Close Bear Valley Trail for up to Three Weeks Starting September 17, 2012

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Date: September 11, 2012
Contact: John Dell’Osso, 415-464-5135

The Bear Valley Trail will be closed to visitors starting Monday, September 17 for up to three weeks, including weekends, for the replacement of a culvert as well as restoration of a small section of highly eroded creek bank. This closure is required due to partial failure of a culvert which has allowed minor sedimentation into the creek. Additionally, the highly eroded bank repair is required to maintain current alignment and safety of the trail. Hikers and equestrians can still access the first section of Bear Valley Trail from the Trailhead parking area to Mount Wittenberg Trail junction (0.2 miles away). After ascending the Mount Wittenberg Trail, visitors can go onto the Sky Trail then onto Meadow Trail to return to Bear Valley Trail. Visitors are encouraged to pick up a free trail map from the Bear Valley Visitor Center. Bear Valley Creek contains the federally-threatened steelhead trout and this project will improve two distinct areas of steelhead habitat.

The culvert replacement projects would restore or enhance natural hydrologic process by replacing the existing culvert with an 11' x 7' corrugated steel pipe-arch culvert. This culvert will provide improved fish passage while leaving the restored trail essentially unchanged. The lower bank repair will restore a short section of creek bank using log revetment structures to reduce energy during high flow events. The restored creek bank will be planted with native vegetation to improve habitat.

NOTE: You may download a map (1,340 KB PDF) of the site. It is also available upon request from John Dell'Osso by email.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Tule Elk

In the mid-1800s, the tule elk was hunted to the brink of extinction. The last surviving tule elk were discovered and protected in the southern San Joaquin Valley in 1874. In 1978, ten tule elk were reintroduced to Point Reyes, which now has one of California's largest populations, numbering ~500. More...