• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Deadline for Initial Public Comment on the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit EIS Extended to November 26, 2010

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Date: November 22, 2010
Contact: Melanie Gunn, 415-464-5131

Point Reyes Station – The National Park Service (NPS) announced extension of the public comment period to November 26, 2010. A power outage in the Fort Collins, CO, offices of the NPS Natural Resource Program Center on Saturday, November 20 shut down servers for the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) web site for approximately 18 hours. As a result, people were unable to access the site and provide comments during that time on all NPS projects open for public comment, including the Point Reyes National Seashore Drakes Bay Estero Oyster Company Special Use Permit Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The servers came back online at 3:05 p.m. PST Saturday the 20th and are fully functional.

The preferred method for submitting comments remains the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment site at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/pore. From the main page, click on the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit EIS link, then on the "Open for Comment" link, select the Scoping Letter folder and then follow the directions to comment. Comments may also be mailed or hand delivered to

DBOC SUP EIS
c/o Superintendent
Point Reyes National Seashore
1 Bear Valley Road
Point Reyes Station, CA 94956

Additional information on the scoping process is available at the park web site.

The NPS is beginning the preparation of an EIS to evaluate potential issuance of a Special Use Permit for commercial oyster operations within Drakes Estero for a period of 10 years. The NPS opened the public comment period for initial scoping on October 8, 2010 and held three public meetings in late October.

-NPS-

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