• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Point Reyes National Seashore Initiates Public Access Improvements for the Giacomini Wetland Restoration

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Date: December 4, 2009
Contact: Brannon Ketcham, 415-464-5192
Contact: John Dell’Osso, 415-464-5135

Recovery.gov logo (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009)

Point Reyes National Seashore has initiated stabilization and rehabilitation activities on the barn at the Giacomini Wetland overlook in Point Reyes Station. These activities are part of a larger project, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) program, to develop and improve public access and overlooks associated with Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project. Multiple project actions intended to improve and enhance access and visitor experience at Giacomini Restoration Area overlooks will be conducted in the next nine months.

Between December and February, contractors and National Seashore historic preservation crew staff will be working on the barn at the dairy mesa adjacent to Point Reyes Station. This work is intended to remove non-historic features and to stabilize the structure. Initially, preservation crew staff will shore up the existing roof structure and will rebuild the east and west walls of the barn. Contractors will conduct selective demolition of non-historic features of the barn, and ultimately re-roof the lower sloped sections of the barn. The stabilization activities are not intended to alter the current use of the barn, which is for invasive plant removal and revegetation projects conducted within the wetlands.

Additional work that will be conducted through this project includes the development of an improved trail network and landscaping on the dairy mesa as well as reroute and improvements to the Tomales Bay Trail which will provide extensive viewing opportunities of the restoration area as well as Tomales Bay. These tasks are currently under design, and the Seashore anticipates work on the trails to commence in the spring of 2010.

The ARRA funds are part of a stimulus package that is an important component of the President's plan to jumpstart the economy and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so the country can thrive in the 21st century. Under the ARRA, Interior is making an investment in conserving America's timeless treasures—our stunning natural landscapes, our monuments to liberty, the icons of our culture and heritage—while helping American families and their communities prosper again. Interior is also focusing on renewable energy projects, the needs of American Indians, employing youth and promoting community service.

"With its investments of Recovery Act funds, the Department of the Interior and its bureaus are putting people to work today to make improvements that will benefit the environment and the region for many years to come," Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said.

Secretary Salazar has pledged unprecedented levels of transparency and accountability in the implementation of the Department’s economic recovery projects. The public will be able to follow the progress of each project on www.recovery.gov and on www.interior.gov/recovery. Secretary Salazar has appointed a Senior Advisor for Economic Recovery, Chris Henderson, and an Interior Economic Recovery Task Force to work closely with Interior’s Inspector General and ensure the recovery program is meeting the high standards for accountability, responsibility, and transparency set by President Obama.

This local project’s activities are consistent with the selected alternative published in the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project EIS/EIR in 2007. More information on the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project and monitoring activities is available on the park web site http://www.nps.gov/pore/parkmgmt/planning_giacomini_wrp.htm

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Kule Loklo, a replica of a Coast Miwok village

Coast Miwok people have lived in the Point Reyes vicinity for over 4,000 years. They lived in villages similar to Kule Loklo, which is located near the Bear Valley Visitor Center. More...