• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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Restore It and They Will Come: Celebrate an Environmental Success Story at Point Reyes National Seashore

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Date: October 15, 2009
Contact: Mark Bartolini, 415-663-1200 x301
Contact: John Dell’Osso, 415-464-5135

On October 25th the National Park Service (NPS) and the Point Reyes National Seashore Association (PRNSA) will celebrate the one-year anniversary of the Giacomini Wetlands Restoration Project by holding a series of events that will highlight the amazing transformations taking place on more than 600 acres of restored wetlands at the southern end of Tomales Bay in the Point Reyes National Seashore.

In the year since the last levees were removed from this former dairy operation, new habitats have formed that have led to the return of numerous species of plants and wildlife that reflect the historic conditions of this vital wetland. Thousands of waterfowl and shorebirds are using the newly restored wetlands, with 350 acres of the 550-acre former Giacomini Dairy Ranch now open to the tides. River otters, raptors, and even bald eagles have been frequent visitors to the new marsh, which is quickly converting from dairy pasture to salt and brackish marsh.

The one year anniversary offers the public an opportunity to see first-hand how nature—given the right conditions—can dramatically reestablish its historic presence.

Morning activities will include a kayaking tour of the wetlands (bring your own kayak and personal flotation device) starting at 10:00 a.m. from the White House Pool parking lot.

For those who would rather see the wetlands from land, a guided walking tour to a wetlands overlook will depart at 11:00 a.m. from the Tomales Bay Trail parking lot, north of the town of Point Reyes Station on Highway One. Heavy rain and wind cancels outdoor events.

In the afternoon, a reception with refreshments will be held from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Red Barn at Park Headquarters in Olema.

Park scientists will offer shirt presentations on returning birds, fish, and vegetation and the future of the project. Park hydrologists will discuss the design and impact of the project as well as the projected impacts due to sea level rise.

-NPS-

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