• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Prescribed Burns in Olema Valley Planned for Week of September 30, 2001

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Date: September 28, 2001
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

Point Reyes National Seashore will conduct prescribed fires in the Olema Valley the week of September 30th if weather conditions allow. The areas planned for burns are along Highway One near the Five Brooks area and further south towards Dogtown. The goal of the program is to systematically reduce hazardous fuel loads and eliminate some non-native plant species. The burn in the Five Brooks area is approximately 30 acres in size, burns in the Hagmaier area total approximately 175 acres, and burns in the Dogtown area total approximately 115 acres. These areas will be burned in small sections and will probably take several days to conduct.

Additional prescribed fires are planned for different areas of the National Seashore during the next six weeks . The main objectives of this fire program are to reduce hazardous fuels, create fuel breaks, and remove non-native vegetation. To complete this prescribed fire program, the National Park Service has developed a specialized fire management team which works in cooperation with Marin County Fire Department.

Burning also provides other ecological benefits such as improved wildlife habitat and an improved environment for native plant species.

The prescribed fires will only be conducted if weather and other conditions are favorable. The fire will be monitored and staffed by National Park Service personnel and local fire departments.

Interagency fire management information can be found on the FireNet website at www.nps.gov/fire.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Fog-filled valley with yellow twilight glow over a ridge in the background. © John B. Weller.

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