• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Point Reyes National Seashore Named as One of America's "Globally Important Bird Areas"

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Date: June 4, 2001
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

In an announcement last week, Point Reyes National Seashore was officially named to the 100 "Globally Important Bird Areas" list by the national non-profit organization, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) in recognition of its significance in the ongoing effort to conserve wild birds and their habitats.

One of America’s greatest coastlines, Point Reyes National Seashore comprises over 71,000 acres, including 32,000 acres of wilderness area. Estuaries, windswept beaches, coastal grasslands, salt marshes, and coniferous forests combine to create a haven of 80 miles of unspoiled and undeveloped coastline. As wildland habitat is lost elsewhere in California, the relevance of the Point Reyes Peninsula increases as a protected area with a notably rich biological diversity. Recently, Population Action International has also listed Central California as one of the top 25 global biologically diverse hotspots. These hotspots are "considered to be the most threatened of all biologically rich terrestrial regions of the world." Over 45% of North American avian species have been seen in the park due to the variety of habitat and uniqueness of the geology. Six Federally-listed threatened and endangered bird species exist within the Seashore and an additional thirty-three species of birds are listed as Species of Concern by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Superintendent Don Neubacher stated, "Point Reyes is truly a magnificent peninsula and we will do our best to ensure its long-term future."

Dr. Sarah Allen, Science Advisor at the Seashore added, "The sheer number of bird species seen along the Point Reyes Peninsula reconfirm its importance to the ecosystem. This truly is one of America’s national treasures, providing habitat and food for resident species as well as migratory birds."

ABC’s Global IBA program aims to identify and protect a network of key sites to further bird conservation efforts. IBA programs have been initiated throughout the world, including Europe, The Middle East, Africa, Canada, Mexico, and Ecuador as well as the United States.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Deathcap Mushrooms © John Lennie

Deathcap mushrooms are found throughout the Point Reyes region and are the most poisonous mushrooms in the world. But they're fairly new arrivals here. They invaded the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1930s, likely brought over on cork trees from Europe for the wine industry. More...