• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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2000 Strawberry Festival at Kule Loklo

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Date: April 11, 2000
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

Please join us for this Native American celebration of the new spring season at Kule Loklo at Point Reyes National Seashore on Saturday, April 22, 2000. Please join the festivities at Kule Loklo with traditional dances and other cultural demonstrations such as flintknapping, clam shell bead drilling, and Native American games throughout the afternoon. Food, including Indian tacos, will be for sale at the site. The festival starts at 11 am with cultural demonstrations. Traditional dancing will begin after 1 pm. Kule Loklo means "Bear Valley" in the Coast Miwok dialect, and the village is a cultural exhibit representing a Coast Miwok community before European contact.

Visitors are encouraged to bring strawberries for the traditional blessing of the first fruits.

For more information, please call the Bear Valley Visitor Center at (415) 663-1092, Monday through Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm and weekends 8:00 am - 5:00 pm.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Tule Elk

In the mid-1800s, the tule elk was hunted to the brink of extinction. The last surviving tule elk were discovered and protected in the southern San Joaquin Valley in 1874. In 1978, ten tule elk were reintroduced to Point Reyes, which now has one of California's largest populations, numbering ~500. More...