• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • 2014 Harbor Seal Pupping Season Closures

    From March 1 through June 30, the park implements closures of certain Tomales Bay beaches and Drakes Estero to water-based recreation to protect harbor seals during the pupping season. Please avoid disturbing seals to ensure a successful pupping season. More »

  • 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus Operations Have Ended

    March 30, 2014, was the last day for the 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus System. Sir Francis Drake Blvd. is open daily from now through late December 2014. More »

  • Operational Changes Took Effect on May 1, 2013

    The Lighthouse Visitor Center is now only open Fridays through Mondays; closed Tuesdays through Thursdays, including Thanksgiving. The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center is open on weekends and holidays when shuttles are operating. More »

Prescribed Fire in Olema Valley Scheduled for October 1, 1997

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Date: October 1, 1997
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

Because air temperatures have subsided, a prescribed fire is scheduled for today, Wednesday, October 1, 1997 and will begin at approximately 10:00 am. The fire will be on a 30 acre site located in Olema Valley on the east side of Highway 1 near the McCurdy Trailhead.

The prescribed burn is part of an ongoing National Park Service effort to reduce hazardous fuels and to remove the invasive, non-native plant, scotch broom. Because control of the broom has been limited in the past, the quickly spreading plant has "crowded out" California native plants.

Prescribed burning has been an effective method in removing invasive plants from the Point Reyes National Seashore. Burning also provides other ecological benefits such as improved wildlife habitat, reduction of hazardous fuels, and an improved environment for native plant species.

The prescribed fire will only be conducted if weather and other conditions are favorable. The fire will be monitored and staffed by National Park Service.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Four tidewater gobies (small brackish-water fish) in a hand. Credit: Cassandra Brooks/NPS.

Since the restoration of the Giacomini Wetlands in 2008, the tidewater goby--a federally endangered brackish-water resident fish species--has not only been observed in the newly restored channels and ponds, but in Lagunitas Creek, where it had previously not been documented since 1953. More...