• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • 2014 Harbor Seal Pupping Season Closures

    From March 1 through June 30, the park implements closures of certain Tomales Bay beaches and Drakes Estero to water-based recreation to protect harbor seals during the pupping season. Please avoid disturbing seals to ensure a successful pupping season. More »

  • 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus Operations Have Ended

    March 30, 2014, was the last day for the 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus System. Sir Francis Drake Blvd. is open daily from now through late December 2014. More »

  • Operational Changes Took Effect on May 1, 2013

    The Lighthouse Visitor Center is now only open Fridays through Mondays; closed Tuesdays through Thursdays, including Thanksgiving. The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center is open on weekends and holidays when shuttles are operating. More »

Plant Communities

The different plant communities that make up the Point Reyes peninsula are as varied as the different neighborhoods one would expect to find in a bustling city. As you travel around the Seashore, you pass from luxuriant forests of Douglas-fir and bishop pine, into windswept coastal grasslands. You hike through coastal scrub, enjoying the multitude of shrubs with their different smells and textures, to arrive at a salt marsh bordering an estuary. Or perhaps you take a stroll out amongst the coastal dunes to look for rare wildflowers on a spring day. These communities are dynamic. One melds into the next, change sweeps through in dramatic and subtle ways so that what you experience during one visit may be quite different when you return. The next generation of visitors, many years from now, may hike the same trail and experience a mature forest where you walked among newly sprouted trees invading a meadow. All of these dynamic plant communities combine to form a wonderfully diverse tapestry of plant life at Point Reyes National Seashore. Enjoy your exploration!

Vegetation Map

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Did You Know?

The pernicious Cig Egret makes its nest in beaches, estuaries, and marshes. Physical removal is the only means of eradication.

40 percent of all debris items picked up during California Coastal Cleanup Days are cigarette butts. In 2008, volunteers picked up over 340,000 of them in only three hours. 2008 was the 24th straight year in which cigarette butts were the most numerous debris item picked up. More...