• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • 2014 Harbor Seal Pupping Season Closures

    From March 1 through June 30, the park implements closures of certain Tomales Bay beaches and Drakes Estero to water-based recreation to protect harbor seals during the pupping season. Please avoid disturbing seals to ensure a successful pupping season. More »

  • 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus Operations Have Ended

    March 30, 2014, was the last day for the 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus System. Sir Francis Drake Blvd. is open daily from now through late December 2014. More »

  • Operational Changes Took Effect on May 1, 2013

    The Lighthouse Visitor Center is now only open Fridays through Mondays; closed Tuesdays through Thursdays, including Thanksgiving. The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center is open on weekends and holidays when shuttles are operating. More »

Non-native Species

Ice Plant (Carpobrotus edulis) is an extremely invasive species from South Africa.

Ice Plant (Carpobrotus edulis) is an extremely invasive species from South Africa.

The Seashore has more than 10 nonnative species of animals such as mammals, reptiles, and marine organisms. Of the over 900 species of plants in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 300 are nonnative. Of those, at least 30 are invasive enough to threaten the diversity of native plant communities in the Seashore. The Seashore also supports 51 special status (rare) plant species, many of which are directly affected by invasive nonnative species. Exotic species can have severe impacts on natural plants and animals and ecosystems.

Parks like Point Reyes are specifically mandated to control exotic species "up to and including eradication" of a population if that species does not meet an identified park purpose and if such control is "prudent and feasible." Only through the removal of exotics and other changes resulting from human disturbance can the NPS return its park units to the most natural condition possible and meet its mandate to preserve them in this condition for future generations.

To learn about the nonnative deer in the park visit the Exotic Deer page.

To learn about nonnative plants in the park visit the Exotic/Invasive Plants page.

Learn more about Invasive Species in the Fall 2004 Special Issue of Park Science. (html or 4.72 MB PDF).

Please visit our Help Stop the Spread of Non-Native Species page to learn how you can help prevent the introduction and spread of non-native plants and animals.

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Did You Know?

California red-legged frog

So many California red-legged frogs were caught for consumption in the late 1800's that their numbers declined throughout California. So bullfrogs were imported from the east to help meet the demand. But bullfrogs are voracious predators and helped drive the red-legged frog population lower yet. More...