• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • Bear Valley Visitor Center Lighting Retrofit:

    Due to safety concerns during the installation of new LED lights, sections of the Bear Valley Visitor Center's exhibit area may be closed through the end of July. More »

  • The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center will be closed on Saturday, July 26.

    We are sorry for any inconvenience, but the Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center at Drakes Beach will be closed on Saturday, July 26. It will open at 10 am on Sunday, July 27.

Stories

Oral History Program

The Point Reyes National Seashore museum collection currently holds over forty interviews compiled by the park historian between 1985-1994. The recordings preserve the first-hand knowledge, memories and ideas of people involved in generations of dairy and cattle ranching, oyster farming, and fishing in the area. Other interviewees speak of Coast Miwok culture, the search for Sir Francis Drake's landing site, service at the Coast Guard station at Point Reyes, and Morse code radio operations at the historic Marconi/RCA radio stations.

Currently, the museum is developing a program to continue collecting and expanding the scope and uses of it's oral history collection. A recent survey conducted by the Seashore yielded an expanded list of oral history programs and collections in Marin relevant to the history of the land and the development of the park. For further information about the oral history collection or program development contact the museum archivist, Carola DeRooy at 415-464-5125 or by e-mail.

Links to other oral history collections about West Marin history, culture, and commerce.
The Bolinas Museum
Marin Agricultural Land Trust
Marin History Museum
Marin County Free Libraries
Anne T. Kent California Room
Tomales Regional History Project

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Did You Know?

Waves crashing on rocks during a storm.

A 1-foot sea level rise can lead to shorelines eroding back 100 feet, and increase the chances of a 100-year flood event in low coastal areas to once every 10 years. More...