• Stone Ruins at the Sand Springs Pony Express Station in Nevada

    Pony Express

    National Historic Trail CA,CO,KS,MO,NE,NV,UT,WY

Things To Do

Photo image of Chimney Rock.

The Wagner Perspective

There are a number of ways to enjoy the Pony Express National Historic Trail, including auto-touring, visiting interpretive sites, hiking, biking or horseback riding trail segments, and visiting museums. Depending on which trail segment you would like to explore, some or all of these activities may be available.

Although the word "trail" is used in the name, the Pony Express NHT is not a true hiking trail. With 1,800 miles of the original route now in the hands of various private and public entities, access to trail segments depends upon the permission of the land owner. Some segments are open to the public for hiking and other means of recreation, while others are not.

Following is a list of recommended activities for the Pony Express NHT. Inquiries about segments not listed are best made locally. See the Links and Resources, the Trail Sites and Auto Tour Route driving directions pages for more information.

Camping

The National Park Service does not offer any camping facilities along the trail. Inquire locally (see Links and Resources page).

Short Hikes (usually less than 300 yards to trail ruts or historic sites

Long Hikes (access to extensive trail segments)

4x4 and Horse Access (extensive trail segments)

  • Oregon Trail Road: Mills, WY to WYO-220 just north of Independence Rock, 41.5 miles
  • South Pass Segment: Independence Rock to Parting of the Ways, 125 miles
  • Parting of the Ways: end of the South Pass segment
  • Fort Bridger to Muddy Creek: approximately 14 miles
  • BLM Backcountry Byway from Fairfield, UT to Ibapah, UT: 133 miles

Trail Museums

Did You Know?

Sand Hill relay station on the Pony Express trail in Nevada

Pony Express riders generally rode their horses at full gallop for 12-15 miles before changing horses at relay stations such as this one at Sand Hill in western Nevada.