• Pipe Spring National Monument

    Pipe Spring

    National Monument Arizona

4 - E'nengweng

E'nengweng
E'NENGWENG

Known as the E'nengweng to the Paiutes, Hisatsinom to the Hopi, and Anasazi to the Navajo, ancestral peoples lived throughout the southwest 500 to 1100 years ago. They typically built pithouses (below ground structures) and/or pueblos (above ground structures) from rock and wood. A group of them built a pueblo near Matungwa'va. They used the water from the spring to grow corn, beans and squash, and hunted animals that were attracted to the spring. These people made and used pottery for cooking and storing food.

The Kaibab Paiute believe the E'nengweng were their ancestors. They believe Tumpee'po'-ohp - petroglyphs (pictures pecked into stone) and pictographs (pictures painted on stone) - made by the E'nengweng are the link that connects them together. The places where these pictures are found are revered. The early Paiutes continued the tradition of rock writing.

Did You Know?

Fort at Pipe Spring

The fort at Pipe Spring National Monument was built over a spring, similar to castles in Europe and the Middle East.