• Pipe Spring National Monument

    Pipe Spring

    National Monument Arizona

Plateau Country Trees

Plateau Country Trees
 

Two evergreens important to the Paiute people grow intermingled on this ridge top. Throughout the desert Southwest, at elevations The smell of this “cedar” permeated Paiute daily life. Juniper trees were fashioned into both summer and winter kahns with branches and bark providing layers of insulation. Juniper wood made good bows. Dried needles were burned like incense during special ceremonies. from 4,500 to 7,500 feet above sea level, with more than 12 inches of rain a year, look for stands of pinyon and juniper like those you see here.

 
Juniperus Osteasperma, Pinus Edulis, Pinyon Nuts
Juniperus Osteasperma
The smell of this “cedar” permeated Paiute daily life. Juniper trees were fashioned into both summer and winter kahns with branches and bark providing layers of insulation. Juniper wood made good bows. Dried needles were burned like incense during special ceremonies.

Pinus Edulis
Pinyon nuts (below) were gathered each fall to be eaten both raw and roasted. Rich in protein and fats, pinyon nuts store well and can last throughout a winter. Pinyon pitch could be chewed like gum. Pitch also made good glue and waterproofing for baskets.

Pinyon Nuts
Paiute summer shelter, made of juniper branches, as photographed in 1872
 

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