• Poplar Grove National Cemetery Luminary Event (photo courtesy of Joanne Williams)

    Petersburg

    National Battlefield Virginia

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Pictionary: R

Regiment

A regiment is a unit of the army. A regiment was a military unit composed of ten companies, each of 97 men and 3 officers. However, this organization was seldom, if ever, up to full strength.


Revolver

Revolver

The revolver was a popular weapon among cavalrymen in the Civil War. They fired paper wrapped cartridges, using copper percussion caps to ignite the charge. The revolver, though valued for a quick firing rate, was not always a dependable weapon. They were accurate only at very short range which meant they were useful only in close actions. Such actions were not commonplace for cavalry soldiers in the Civil War, and particularly in the siege warfare seen at Petersburg.


Rifled Musket

Model 1861 Springfield

Enfield Musket

This term, adopted in 1855, designated those shoulder arms that retained the outside dimensions of the old smoothbore muskets but had rifled barrels. While the smoothbore muskets fired a solid round shot, the rifled muskets fired a minnie ball. The rifled muskets had more speed when fired, and could do greater damage to the unlucky soldier who was wounded in battle.



Rubber Blanket

Rubber Blanket

Every soldier was issued a rubber blanket, often called a gum blanket. Soldiers would often lie on the rubber blanket to sleep at night, with the rubber side facing the ground. The rubber side would keep them dry if the ground was wet. They would cover themselves with the issued wool blanket.

Did You Know?

President Lincoln and General Grant at the Wallace House

Union General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant and Army of the Potomac Commander George G. Meade met with Abraham Lincoln on April 3, 1865 at the Thomas Wallace house on Market Street in Petersburg. President Lincoln visited Petersburg again on April 7, 1865. (Petersburg National Battlefield)