• Jasper Forest is magical in twilight, particularly the logs on stone pedestals

    Petrified Forest

    National Park Arizona

2008 Artist in Residence

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: March 10, 2008
Contact: Scott Williams, (928) 524-6228 ext. 240

Petrified Forest National Park
2008 Artist-in-Residence Program

Petrified Forest, AZ – “Petrified Forest National Park has selected nine artists and two alternates to participate in the 2008 Artist-in-Residence Program,” stated park Superintendent Cliff Spencer. The finalists are: Amy Hautman, Cameron Zebrun, Joe Decker, Miriam Sagan, Francis E. Kazemek, Robert Dorlac, David Brook, Rosanna Salonia, and Matthew Yates. The two alternate artists are: Tim E. Jaster & Martha J. Egan. The Artist-in-Residence program will begin on April 7 and continue through November, 2008. The park has also invited previous residence program artists: Michael Kabotie and Shonto Begay to share their cultural and artistic knowledge about the park with the visiting public. 

This program will provide the opportunity for selected artists to pursue their particular art form in the dynamic setting of Petrified Forest National Park. The goal of the program is to further both the artists’ and public’s understanding of the significance of the park. In addition to creating artwork, it is equally important for the artists to provide a positive learning and interpretive experience for park visitors regarding the park as inspiration for artistic endeavors and to increase understanding of the park’s resources. The park invites visitors to participate in the artist’s presentations and demonstrations that will be scheduled during the residence program. Go to the Artist-In-Residence page for a schedule.

For more information call (928) 524-6228 weekdays, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time; or write to the Superintendent, Petrified Forest National Park, P.O. Box 2217, Petrified Forest, AZ 86028; or e-mail the park.

Did You Know?

spiral petroglyph marks the summer solstice

Petroglyphs are sometimes calendars, marking events like the summer solstice with interactions between the glyph, the sun, and natural landscape features.