• Flying artillery crew in action.

    Palo Alto Battlefield

    National Historical Park Texas

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Road Maintenance

    Maintenance on parks roads and parking areas will begin Monday, September 1st and will continue through Friday, September 5th. Access to roads and parking areas may be limited at times. Call the park for the latest on road and parking conditions.

Christmas Bird Count 2009

Meadow Lark

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
News Release Date: January 1, 2010
Contact: 26.024520874023437,-97.46247863769531, <P>When they arrived at the Palo Alto Battlefield near midday on May 8, 1846, soldiers noted that the music of birds filled the air. But the peaceful natural sound was soon overwhelmed by martial music and blasts from cannon sent startled birds fleeing for more peaceful surroundings.</P>
<P>Today, 164 years after the battle, it is the birds that remain on the site. And, as part of the Audubon Society’s 110 annual Christmas Bird Count, Palo Alto Battlefield NHP has a glimpse of which birds are currently in the park.</P>
<P>The survey, conducted on December 26, 2009, identified 16 different bird species within the park boundaries. These included:</P>
<P>
<TABLE border=1 cellSpacing=2 summary="Table Summary" cellPadding=2 width="100%">
<TBODY>
<TR>
<TD>Northern Bobwhite 6 sighted</TD>
<TD> White-tailed Hawk 1 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> American Kestrel 1 sighted</TD>
<TD> Northern Mockingbird 6 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Eurasian Collared-Dove 1 sighted</TD>
<TD> Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler 1 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Belted Kingfisher 1 sighted</TD>
<TD> Savannah Sparrow 11 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Golden-fronted Woodpecker 1 sighted</TD>
<TD> Grasshopper Sparrow 2 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Eastern Phoebe 2 sighted</TD>
<TD> Eastern Meadowlark 8 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Great Kiskadee 1 sighted</TD>
<TD> Meadowlark sp. 5 sighted</TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD> Loggerhead Shrike 2 sighted</TD>
<TD> Great-tailed Grackle 2 sighted</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></P>
<P>These birds represent only a small percentage of the species and numbers of birds at Palo Alto.  While dozens of bird-watchers descended upon other sites around the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, the Palo Alto count was conducted by just two people: Rolando Garza, the park’s resource manager and Katherine Miller of Resaca de la Palma State Park. Although the two other them covered many different areas, they were not able to thoroughly cover the entire 3,400 acre site.</P>
<P>Previous surveys have revealed many additional bird species and bird-watchers who visit the park have added to the list. The park also expects to supplement the list of identified species by actively participating in future bird counts.</P>

When they arrived at the Palo Alto Battlefield near midday on May 8, 1846, soldiers noted that the music of birds filled the air. But the peaceful natural sound was soon overwhelmed by martial music and blasts from cannon sent startled birds fleeing for more peaceful surroundings.

Today, 164 years after the battle, it is the birds that remain on the site. And, as part of the Audubon Society's 110 annual Christmas Bird Count, Palo Alto Battlefield NHP has a glimpse of which birds are currently in the park.

The survey, conducted on December 26, 2009, identified 16 different bird species within the park boundaries. These included:

 Northern Bobwhite 6 sighted  White-tailed Hawk 1 sighted
American Kestrel 1 sighted Northern Mockingbird 6 sighted
Eurasian Collared-Dove 1 sighted Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler 1 sighted
Belted Kingfisher 1 sighted Savannah Sparrow 11 sighted
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 1 sighted Grasshopper Sparrow 2 sighted
Eastern Phoebe 2 sighted Eastern Meadowlark 8 sighted
Great Kiskadee 1 sighted Meadowlark sp. 5 sighted
Loggerhead Shrike 2 sighted Great-tailed Grackle 2 sighted

These birds represent only a small percentage of the species and numbers of birds at Palo Alto. While dozens of bird-watchers descended upon other sites around the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, the Palo Alto count was conducted by just two people: Rolando Garza, the park's resource manager and Katherine Miller of Resaca de la Palma State Park. Although the two other them covered many different areas, they were not able to thoroughly cover the entire 3,400 acre site.

Previous surveys have revealed many additional bird species and bird-watchers who visit the park have added to the list. The park also expects to supplement the list of identified species by actively participating in future bird counts.

Did You Know?

Battle of Palo Alto

In 1870, residents of Brownsville placed a stone monument at Palo Alto in the first effort to commemorate the site.