• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Madison Falls Trail Closed for Repairs Beginning July 7

    The one-tenth mile Madison Falls Trail and trailhead parking lot located in Elwha Valley will close to public entry beginning on Monday, July 7 while crews make improvements and repairs.

  • Spruce Railroad Trail Improvements to Begin August 5

    Spruce Railroad Trail will be closed from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Rabies

    Rabies has been detected in a single bat in the Lake Crescent area of the park. Rabies exposure is extremely rare, but fatal if untreated. Anyone observing unusual or aggressive behavior among park wildlife should inform a park ranger as soon as possible. More »

Accessibility

man in wheelchair looking at a rhododendron
Olympic offers opportunities for all people to enjoy and explore.
 

Click on an area name for a list and description of accessible trails and facilities in that area, or download a PDF version.

 

Olympic National Park Visitor Center
Port Angeles


Fully accessible building with exhibits on park's natural and cultural history. Several touch displays, an audio program and displays with sound effects. Park orientation video (27 minutes) is shown on request with closed captioning available. Hearing Assisted Technology (HAT) is available at the information desk. Accessible restrooms.

For general information call (360) 565-3130. TTY users can use the Washington relay service (800-833-6385 or 800-833-6388) to obtain information.

The Living Forest Trail

This 0.4 mile hard-packed surface loop trail leads through forest to a view of Peabody Creek valley. A wheelchair is available for checkout.

 

Hurricane Ridge Area

Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center
Accessible restrooms, exhibits, and captioned orientation movie shown on request. Picnic tables (some with extensions), a gift shop and snack bar are also accessible.

Two picnic areas just beyond the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center have paved trails that are accessible with assistance leading to tables (some with extensions) overlooking the Olympic Mountains; but the restrooms are not accessible.

When the building is staffed, Hearing Assisted Technology (HAT) and a wheelchair are available for use.

Meadow Loop Trails
Paved trails provide excellent views of the Olympic Mountains and the Strait of Juan de Fuca on clear days. Several short, relatively flat loop trails.

 

Elwha Area

Madison Falls Trail
One-tenth mile paved trail to a 60-foot high cascade. There is an accessible vault toilet near the parking lot.

 

Lake Crescent

Storm King Ranger Station
is accessible and is open seasonally; accessible restrooms (open year-round) located nearby. Accessible vault toilets at the East Beach, La Poel, North Shore and Bovee's Meadow picnic areas.

Lake Crescent Lodge has an accessible main lodge, restaurant, lounge and room.

The restaurant at Log Cabin Resort is accessible.

Marymere Falls Trail begins at Storm King Ranger Station, winding through old growth forest. The first half-mile is a hard-packed surface and leads to an overlook of Barnes Creek.

Moments in Time Nature Trail is a 0.8 mile loop trail with hard-packed surface, offering views of the lake, old-growth forest and former homestead sites. It can be reached from either the Olympic Park Institute or Lake Crescent Lodge, or from the Storm King Ranger Station via a 0.3 mile trail.

 

Sol Duc Area

Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort
has accessible hot spring pools, rental cabins, restaurant and lodge.

Salmon Cascades is a short gravel and dirt path leading from the Sol Duc Road to a wooden platform overlooking the Sol Duc River. Look for leaping salmon in autumn. Accessible vault toilet.

 

Mora Area

Rialto Beach

A very short paved trail leads from the parking lot to a picnic area in the coastal forest. In summer months, a short ramp is installed, providing access to a beach overlook. The extent of the view depends on the amount of driftwood and rocks washed ashore by storms and high tides.

There is an accessible vault toilet at the parking lot.

 

Kalaloch Area

At Kalaloch Lodge, the main lodge and restaurant are accessible, along with one accessible cabin.

Ruby Beach has an accessible viewpoint overlooking Ruby Beach and Cedar Creek. Accessible vault toilet in parking lot.

Beach Trail #4 provides an accessible viewpoint overlooking the Pacific Ocean; accessible vault toilet in parking lot.

 

Hoh Rain Forest Area

The Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is accessible and has restrooms, information and exhibits on the temperate rain forest. There is a wheelchair available for checkout when the visitor center is open and staffed.

Mini-Rain Forest Trail is a flat, quarter-mile paved trail with a small stream and towering Sitka spruce trees. The trail is paved, although there are roots pushing the pavement up in a number of areas.

The Hoh picnic area has accessible restrooms and one accessible site with table extensions.

 

Quinault Valley

The Quinault River Ranger Station, located on the north side of Lake Quinault, has accessible vault toilets. The ranger station includes exhibits and is open intermittently.

The Maple Glades Trail is a 0.5 mile hard-packed loop trail through a moss-draped rain forest.

Kestner Homestead Trail is a 1.3 mile self-guided, hard-packed loop trail. It links with the Maple Glades Trail and leads to the historic Kestner Homestead.

Did You Know?

Mossy trees in the Hoh Rainforest

...that one criterion for the determination of a temperate rain forest is that the amount of moss and other epiphytes exceeds the weight of all the foliage (leaves and needles) per acre by at least two times.