• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

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  • Madison Falls Trail Closed for Repairs Beginning July 7

    The one-tenth mile Madison Falls Trail and trailhead parking lot located in Elwha Valley will close to public entry beginning on Monday, July 7 while crews make improvements and repairs.

  • Hurricane Ridge Road Closed to Vehicles Sunday 8/3 (6:00a - noon)

    Due to the "Ride the Hurricane" bicycle event, the road to Hurricane Ridge will be closed from 6:00a to noon on Sunday August 3rd.

Photos & Multimedia


 
 
A mural illustration of the park shows the wide variety of animals and plants living in the park.

Interactive Species Mural

Artist: Dawson

Olympic National Park's brochure mural has a variety of plants and animals illustrating the diversity of life in the area. Find out the names of the species of plants and animals on the mural by exploring these interactive PDFs.

 
This mural is from the Freeing the Elwha Brochure. The painting depicts a variety of plants and animal species that live in the Elwha Estuary. Includes: bobcat, a variety of birds, lilies, and more.

Elwha Restoration: Animals of the Estuary Area

Artist: Eifert

Plant and Animals from the Freeing the Elwha:
A Story of Dam Removal and Restoration Murals

These two interactive murals are renditions of the restored watershed, from its headwaters in the Olympic Mountains to its estuary in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Download the PDFs of the murals and roll your mouse over the numbers to find out the names of a variety of species that will benefit from this ongoing river restoration project. To learn more about the restoration project, visit the Elwha River Restoration pages.

Elwha River Restoration: Estuary Mural

Elwha River Restoration: Uplands Mural

Did You Know?

star-shaped purple flowers growing in a crack of a rock

That the Piper's bellflower is unique to the Olympic Mountains? Named after an early Olympic peninsula botanist, the Piper's bellflower grows in cracks and crevices of high elevation rock outcrops.