• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

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  • Madison Falls Trail Closed for Repairs Beginning July 7

    The one-tenth mile Madison Falls Trail and trailhead parking lot located in Elwha Valley will close to public entry beginning on Monday, July 7 while crews make improvements and repairs.

  • Hurricane Ridge Road Closed to Vehicles Sunday 8/3 (6:00a - noon)

    Due to the "Ride the Hurricane" bicycle event, the road to Hurricane Ridge will be closed above the Heart o' the Hills entrance station from 6:00a to noon on Sunday August 3rd.

Olympic National Park Launches Planning Process for Existing Park Wilderness

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Date: January 23, 2013
Contact: Barb Maynes, 360-565-3005
Contact: Rainey McKenna, 360-565-2985

Olympic National Park invites the public to participate in developing a Wilderness Stewardship Plan to help protect and manage the designated wilderness lands within the park.  

"The Olympic Wilderness was designated by Congress in 1988 and has become one of the most popular wilderness destinations in the country," said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. "We are excited to be moving ahead with a comprehensive plan for how we protect and manage this area and are looking forward to hearing thoughts and ideas from our public." 

The plan will be developed in accordance with the Wilderness Act of 1964 and analyzed through an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process. In the coming weeks, a Notice of Intent to Prepare an EIS will be published in the Federal Register. The public comment period begins today and will continue for 60 days after the Federal Register notice is published. 

"One of the first steps in any planning process is to learn what the public's thoughts, questions and concerns are," said Creachbaum. "We welcome online and written comments and have also scheduled eight public workshops for people to share their thoughts and learn more about the plan." 

More information about the Olympic Wilderness Stewardship Plan and planning process, including a public scoping newsletter, is available online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/olymwild. Comments may also be submitted at that website. 

Public workshops will be offered around the Olympic Peninsula and are scheduled as follows. 

February 5, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Jefferson School Gymnasium, 218 E. 12th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362

February 7, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382

February 19, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Sekiu Community Center, 42 Rice, Sekiu, WA 98381

February 20, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Department of Natural Resources Conference Room, 411 Tillicum Lane, Forks, WA 98331

February 21, 2013, 4:00-6:00pm
Amanda Park Library, 6118 U.S. Highway 101, Amanda Park, WA 98526

March 4, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Seattle REI Flagship Store, 222 Yale Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109

March 5, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Ridgetop High School, 10600 Hillsboro Drive NW, Silverdale, WA 98383

March 6, 2013, 5:00-7:00pm
Shelton Civic Center, 525 W. Cota Street, Shelton, WA 98584

Public comments may also be mailed or delivered to:  

Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum           
Attn: Wilderness Stewardship Plan
Olympic National Park
600 East Park Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 

Ninety-five percent of Olympic National Park was designated as wilderness in 1988, and is part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The Wilderness Act of 1964 established the National Wilderness Preservation System and established a policy for the protection of wilderness resources for public use and enjoyment.

For more information or to be added to the Olympic National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan, people should visit http://parkplanning.nps.gov/olymwild or call the park at 360-565-3004. --NPS--

Did You Know?

Mt. Olympus in winter

That Mount Olympus receives over 200 inches of precipitation each year and most of that falls as snow? At 7,980 feet, Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Olympic National Park and has the third largest glacial system in the contiguous U.S.