• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Enchanted Valley Temporarily Closed to Camping September 1-14

    To protect contractor and visitor safety, Enchanted Valley will be temporarily closed to all public camping during the relocation of Enchanted Valley Chalet. Hikers and stock users may continue to travel through the valley, must be escorted by park staff. More »

  • Spruce Railroad Trail Improvements to Begin August 5

    Spruce Railroad Trail will be closed from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Rabies

    Rabies has been detected in a single bat in the Lake Crescent area of the park. Rabies exposure is extremely rare, but fatal if untreated. Anyone observing unusual or aggressive behavior among park wildlife should inform a park ranger as soon as possible. More »

Park Planning

Current Olympic National Park Planning Projects
Current park planning documents are posted on the Olympic National Park pages at the National Park Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) website.

 

Olympic National Park General Management Plan

Completed in November 2008, the General Management Plan establishes a vision for managing Olympic National Park for the next 15 to 20 years and aims to protect natural and cultural resources while improving visitor experiences.

Key points include:

  • Maintaining access to existing developed areas, park trails, campgrounds, and facilities.
  • Seeking additional partnerships to help provide enhanced visitor access and enjoyment (e.g. alternative transit options, expanded interpretive and educational opportunities) and better protection of sensitive resources;
  • Boundary adjustments through willing sellers only, or land exchanges to incorporate sensitive resource areas within the park (e.g. fish habitat, wetlands);
  • Continued protection of wilderness, natural and cultural resources.
 

Olympic National Park Long-Range Interpretive Plan

This Long-Range Interpretive Plan outlines recommendations for future interpretive services, facilities, and media. Park staff, partners, and stakeholders worked together to develop this comprehensive tool. It outlines educational and recreational opportunities for visitors to develop intellectual and emotional connections to the natural and cultural resources found within Olympic National Park. Our goal is to promote Olympic National Park’s resource values through planned visitor experiences and excellence in interpretation.

Did You Know?

View of the Elwha Valley

Did you know that in 1988, Congress designated 95% of Olympic National Park as Wilderness. The Olympic Wilderness is a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. More...