• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Ditch Maintenance Along Park Roads: Motorists May Encounter Delays

    Motorists may encounter delays along Sol Duc Road (9/30 - 10/1), Whiskey Bend Road (10/2), Deer Park Road (10/7-10/8), and Hurricane Ridge Road (10/9 - 10/10) due to routine cleaning of roadway drainage ditches.

  • Olympic Hot Springs Road Closed

    The Elwha Valley's Olympic Hot Springs Road is closed to public entry beyond the Altair Campground. Olympic Hot Springs is not accessible from the Elwha. The road is expected to re-open by Summer 2015.

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Removal of the Glines Canyon Dam

Looking upstream at Glines Canyon dam

A view of Glines Canyon dam from downstream

Scott Church

Dam Removal Strategy:

The removal of the Glines Canyon dam will proceed through a series of steps.

  • First, water will be diverted through the penstock to lower Lake Mills Reservoir up to 80 feet. This will allow for work to occur at Elwha dam with some level of flood protection provided by the Lake Mills drawdown.
  • Once that preliminary work is accomplished at Elwha dam, removal of the upper portion of Glines Canyon dam can occur. At this point, water is flowing over the newly lowered dam crest. The dam will then be notched on alternating sides to create temporary spillways that can be used to further drain the reservoirs.
  • Layers of the dam can then be removed as the reservoir is drained through each new notch. This will be done on alternating sides of the dam until the sediments from the upstream delta have eroded downstream and are resting against the dam.
  • At this point, the remaining portion of the dam will be blasted and the river channel restored.

 
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This webpage was made possible in part by a grant from Washington’s National Park Fund.

Did You Know?

DYK fisher release

Fishers (members of the weasel family, related to minks and otters) were reintroduced to Olympic National Park in 2008-10. They are native to the forests of Washington, including the Olympic Peninsula, but disappeared due to overtrapping in the late 1800s/early 1900s and habitat loss.