• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Nature & Science

three images of Olympic -- mountain, forest with creek, and coast
Olympic's diverse ecosystems are home to a stunning variety of plants and animals.
 

From tiny unique flowers on icy peaks to sea stars patrolling foaming tide pools, myriad species find refuge in the sanctuary of Olympic National Park. Geology, climate, isolation, history and sheer size mean this nearly one million-acre park protects relatively intact ecosystems, making it a priceless living laboratory and a home for plants and animals large and small.


To see a list of Olympic National Park endemic plants and animals click here.

Did You Know?

Mt. Olympus in winter

That Mount Olympus receives over 200 inches of precipitation each year and most of that falls as snow? At 7,980 feet, Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Olympic National Park and has the third largest glacial system in the contiguous U.S.