• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

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  • Madison Falls Trail Closed for Repairs Beginning July 7

    The one-tenth mile Madison Falls Trail and trailhead parking lot located in Elwha Valley will close to public entry beginning on Monday, July 7 while crews make improvements and repairs.

  • Hurricane Ridge Road Closed to Vehicles Sunday 8/3 (6:00a - noon)

    Due to the "Ride the Hurricane" bicycle event, the road to Hurricane Ridge will be closed above the Heart o' the Hills entrance station from 6:00a to noon on Sunday August 3rd.

Blacktail Deer

A blacktail deer and her two calves in a meadow near Hurricane Ridge

A blacktail deer and her twin fawns in a meadow near Hurricane Ridge

Ken and Mary Campbell

Blacktail DeerOdocoileus hemionus columbianus

Identification:
Blacktail deer may be the park's most graceful mammal. They are much smaller than Roosevelt elk, and may be seen just about anywhere within Olympic National Park, from subalpine forests and meadowlands down to river valleys. Blacktail deer are considered a subspecies of mule deer, which are common throughout much of the West. They are also closely related to the white-tailed deer, well-known throughout the eastern and Midwestern U.S.

Habitat:
Blacktail deer are particularly common on the edges of forests where there is adequate shelter and ample meadowland. They are often spotted grazing in mountain meadows at dawn and dusk. These graceful creatures are prominent members of the wildlife community.

Diet:
Blacktail deer feed on different types of grasses, lichens, plants, and sometimes berries.

Conservation Status:
Not threatened

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Did You Know?

Mt. Olympus in winter

That Mount Olympus receives over 200 inches of precipitation each year and most of that falls as snow? At 7,980 feet, Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Olympic National Park and has the third largest glacial system in the contiguous U.S.