• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Roadway Ditch Maintenance Along Park Roads: Motorists May Encounter Delays

    Motorists may encounter delays along Sol Duc Road (9/30 - 10/1), Whiskey Bend Road (10/2), Deer Park Road (10/7-10/8), and Hurricane Ridge Road (10/9 - 10/10) between Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 due to routine maintenance to clean roadway drainage ditches.

  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Anadromous Fish

Overview:
Including the five species of Northwest salmon, steelhead, and certain bull trout, anadromous fish refers to those that migrate from freshwater rivers to the ocean and back to spawn in their natal streams. These populations of fish play an integral role in the wildlife community. Bears, otters, eagles, and many others feast on salmon carcasses as a main source of protein when other food is scarce. As well as a significant food source for members of the park community, the life cycle of various anadromous salmon stocks facilitates the transportation of key nutrients to lakes, rivers and streams.

For more information about a particular species, click on the links below.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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This webpage was made possible in part by a grant from Washington's National Park Fund.

Did You Know?

DYK fisher release

Fishers (members of the weasel family, related to minks and otters) were reintroduced to Olympic National Park in 2008-10. They are native to the forests of Washington, including the Olympic Peninsula, but disappeared due to overtrapping in the late 1800s/early 1900s and habitat loss.