• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Amphibians and Reptiles

Rough-skinned newts use their bright orange underbellies as well as a poison secreted from their skin to protect themselves. They breed in ponds but usually live in the forest.

Rough-skinned newts use their bright orange underbellies as well as a poison secreted from their skin to protect themselves. They breed in ponds but usually live in the forest.

Amphibians
Walk through a rain forest valley on a damp spring day and look around at the mossy forest floor, or under the abundant, decaying downed trees. You may spot an amphibian. The ponds, lakes, streams and forests of Olympic National Park provide the ideal habitat for 13 species of frogs, toads, and salamanders. Some, like the rough-skinned newt, which sports a bright orange belly and bumpy brown skin, are common in the lowlands. Others, like the tailed frog, can live in cold, rushing mountain streams.

Throughout the world, many amphibian populations are declining. Though research has revealed Olympic seems to have fairly stable populations of most species, western toads could be declining. With life histories that include life in air and water, amphibians are susceptible to pollution from both sources, as well as being vulnerable to predation by introduced non-natives like bull frogs and eastern brook trout.

Reptiles
The cool, maritime climate in Olympic National Park is not ideal for reptiles. Nevertheless, three types of snakes and a lizard have been noted in the park. There are no venomous snakes on the Olympic Peninsula.

Click here for a list of amphibians and reptiles that have been seen in the park.

 
Cascades frog, found in high elevation streams and lakes.
Cascades frog, found in high elevation streams and lakes.
NPS photo

Did You Know?

Mossy trees in the Hoh Rainforest

...that one criterion for the determination of a temperate rain forest is that the amount of moss and other epiphytes exceeds the weight of all the foliage (leaves and needles) per acre by at least two times.