• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Roadway Ditch Maintenance Along Park Roads: Motorists May Encounter Delays

    Motorists may encounter delays along Sol Duc Road (9/30 - 10/1), Whiskey Bend Road (10/2), Deer Park Road (10/7-10/8), and Hurricane Ridge Road (10/9 - 10/10) between Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 due to routine maintenance to clean roadway drainage ditches.

  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Tribes of the Olympic Peninsula

Two canoes out in the water at the start of the 2002 tribal journey

Many tribes of the Pacific Northwest take part in the Tribal Journey, canoeing the waters of the peninsula.

What if your highways were rivers and mountain ridges? What if your grocery store was the forest and the ocean? What if your home overlooked a beautiful coastline, complete with whales and sunsets? For the original residents of the Olympic Peninsula, the majestic landscape and wealth of resources supplied both physical and spiritual sustenance. Although the land and its ownership have changed, these essential connections have been maintained through generations. Today Olympic National Park protects the natural resources that engendered those connections as well as the cultural resources that reveal the rich history of the people who first called this rugged place home.

Eight Olympic Peninsula tribes continue to recognize a relationship to the park based on traditional land use, origin, beliefs, mythology and spiritual beliefs and practices. These tribes are the Lower Elwha Klallam, Jamestown S'Klallam, Port Gamble S'Klallam, Skokomish, Quinault, Hoh, Quileute, and Makah. It was the ancestors of the these tribes that lived throughout the Olympic Peninsula, but ceded their lands and waters to the federal government through treaties in 1855 and 1856 and now live on reservations along the shores of the peninsula.

Read more (pdf)

 
Historic photo of the Hicks family standing in and around a dugout canoe
The Hicks family, near Chimicum Creek ca. 1914
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, NA681

Did You Know?

dam with water flowing

Removal of two dams on the Elwha River is the second largest ecosystem restoration project in the National Park System.