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  • National Park of American Samoa

    What is a Fruit Bat?

    A fruit bat sleeping upside down.

    Students will be able to articulate what a fruit bat is, identify and explain the fruit bat’s role in the American Samoan tropical rainforest ecosystem, and the National Park of American Samoa’s role in protecting fruit bats.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Lower Elementary: Pre-Kindergarten through Second Grade
    Subjects:
    Science
  • Five different park maps showing various NPS units with four closed and one open.

    This is a classroom based, free teacher led program. National Park Legacy Voyagers is designed for ninth through twelfth grade students so they can go on an exploration of National Park Sites and learn about National Parks. Lesson plans include reading, writing, community service, presenting activities. Activities focus on cultural and natural resources and reasons for national parks. Activities feature budgeting and planning activity.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Ninth Grade-Twelfth Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Biology: Plants, Earth Science, Geology, History, Oceans
    Keywords:
    National Parks, legacy, cultural resources, natural resources, heritage, climate change, careers, Wildland-Urban Interface
  • National Park of American Samoa

    Samoan Art in the Tatau (Tattoo)

    Samoan Art in the Tatau (Tattoo)

    The Samoa islands are a beautiful tropical paradise located in the South Pacific Ocean. The islands are rich in culture, history, legend, and known for its beautiful landscape and climate. One of the most legendary parts of Samoan culture is the tatau or tattoos represent the spiritual and cultural heritage of the islands.




    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fourth Grade-Eighth Grade
    Subjects:
    Art, Design, Visual Arts
  • National Park of American Samoa

    Coral Bleaching: Turning Up The Heat

    Coral Bleaching: Turning Up The Heat

    Coral reefs in American Samoa have turned pure white on several occasions in recent years. They look freshly bleached, quite pretty, but that's a clear sign that they are in trouble. Two very different kinds of stress cause corals to turn white: (1)clorox bleach, and (2)warm water temperatures. Clorox bleaching happens from time to time when a foolish fisherman dumps clorox onto the reef to kill fish. This is very short-sighted because it also kills everything else in the vicinity.

    Good

    Average: 4.0 (52 ratings)

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fifth Grade-Eighth Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Biology: Plants, Climate Change, Conservation, Environment, Marine Biology, Wildlife Biology, Wildlife Management
  • National Park of American Samoa

    What is a Fruit Bat?

    What is a Fruit Bat?

    Fruit bats are considered the only native mammal in American Samoa thus earning the right to be protected within the National Park of American Samoa. Local folklore casts a dark image on fruitbats, portraying them as sinister and devious creatures with connections to the spirit world. These superstitions undermine their ecological importance to the native tropical rainforest. Fruit bats help transfer pollen from one tree to another and are also important for seed dispersal.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Kindergarten-First Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, History, Music, Wildlife Biology
  • National Park of American Samoa

    Coral Reefs: Under Attack

    Coral Reefs: Under Attack

    American Samoa’s reefs have several kinds of starfish (aveau, fetu). Most have five “arms,” like the brilliant blue starfish (Lynkia laevegata), but the crown-of-thorns starfish (alamea, Acanthaster planci) has about 15 arms. They’re a big starfish, with adults commonly over a foot in diameter. They can be a beautiful dark red, or a dark green, often with some red markings. This starfish is one to look at, but not touch.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Fifth Grade-Eighth Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Biology: Plants, Climate Change, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Marine Biology
  • National Park of American Samoa

    I'm A Tree

    I'm A Tree

    Most of the natural vegetation of American Samoa (present before the arrival of Polynesians about 3000 years ago) fits into the category of tropical rainforest. Tropical rainforests are found throughout the world in areas of warm climates and sufficient to plentiful year-round rainfall. The Samoan tropical rainforest originally extended from just inland of the shore up to the summits of the highest mountains.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Second Grade-Fourth Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Plants, Botany, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Visual Arts
  • National Park of American Samoa

    Enviro Musical Chairs

    Enviro Musical Chairs

    There's a certain mystique about the word “biodiversity” that seems to be associated with images of steamy jungles or wondrous new medicines, but the word more specifically refers to the number of species or 'species richness' of an area. One reason why tropical areas are so fascinating is that they contain the highest numbers of plant and animal species found anywhere on earth.American Samoa sits squarely in the tropics, so we should have a high biological diversity here, but we do and we don't

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Sixth Grade-Eighth Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Biology: Plants, Botany, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Marine Biology, Wildlife Biology
  • National Park of American Samoa

    Fruit Bats Are Our Friends

    Fruit Bats Are Our Friends

    Fruit bats are considered the only native mammal in American Samoa thus earning the right to be protected within the National Park of American Samoa. Local folklore casts a dark image on fruit bats, portraying them as sinister and devious creatures with connections to the spirit world. These superstitions undermine their ecological importance to the native tropical rainforest. Fruit bats help transfer pollen from one tree to another and are also important for seed dispersal.

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Second Grade-Third Grade
    Subjects:
    Biology: Animals, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, History, Wildlife Biology
  • National Park of American Samoa

    American Samoa's Role In World War II

    American Samoa's Role In World War II

    Three major countries in the world all had an interest in the Samoa islands. The excellent harbor at Pago Pago became increasingly attractive to both commercial and naval interests. From a historical timeline, students will learn about the history of the Samoa islands and how the two Samoa’s were separated into two different countries. Students will also learn the vital role that American Samoa played during World War II. 

    Very poor

    Average: 1.0 (1 rating)

    Type:
    Lesson Plan
    Grade level:
    Sixth Grade-Eighth Grade
    Subjects:
    Geography, Government, History, Law, World War II
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