• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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  • Nisqually to Paradise delays and Kautz Creek area closure.

    Road construction from the Nisqually Entrance to Longmire. Expect a 30-minute delay, Monday through Friday. Beginning May 29 to mid-July, all services at the Kautz Creek parking and picnic area are closed through the week. Limited parking on Sat & Sun. More »

Eagle Peak Trail

Trail route from Longmire to Eagle Peak/ SW.
A map of the Eagle Peak Trail route from Longmire. Use of a topographic map is recommended.
 

Trail Description:


Distance, round-trip:

7.2 miles

Elevation gain:

2955 feet

Hiking time, round-trip:

5 hours

Wilderness camps:

No

This peak was originally known as Sim-layshe, a Native American word for eagle. When the Longmire family settled nearby, George Longmire anglicized the name to Eagle Peak.

From the National Park Inn, drive past the building with the flagpole, through the employee housing area and across a suspension bridge. Continue .1 mile and park in front of the Community Building. Walk a short distance back up the road toward the bridge. The trailhead is on the right about 50' before the bridge. As an alternative, park near the Longmire Museum or National Park Inn and walk to the trailhead. It is located 50' beyond the bridge on the left.

For the first two miles the trail ascends steeply through dense forest to a small stream, then continues another mile to a meadow. Beyond the meadow the trail is much steeper and rocky as it climbs the final .5 mile to the 5700 ft. saddle where the trail ends.


Along the
Trail:


Most of the trail lies in virgin forest where hikers can enjoy the beauty of tall timber and look for wildlife among the tree branches and forest understory. Lush subalpine flower fields surround the last .5 mile of the trail. Panoramic views await the hearty hiker who reaches Eagle Peak Saddle!


Backpacking:


There is no designated camp along this trail nor atop the Tatoosh Range; however, crosscountry camping opportunities exist for backpackers who are skilled in route finding and minimum impact techniques and wish to camp in a rugged location. Permits are required for camping. Permits and current trail conditions are available park-wide from wilderness information centers, ranger stations, and visitor centers. Fires are prohibited. No pets on trails. Treat water before drinking.

Did You Know?

Artist rendering of the new Paradise Visitor Center.

The park recently completed building a new visitor center at Paradise & rehabilitating the historic Paradise Inn. The new visitor center is more sustainable and less expensive to operate than the existing visitor center. The Paradise Inn, after 90 years of use, was in need of rehabilitation.