• Monocacy National Battlefield, Best Farm

    Monocacy

    National Battlefield Maryland

Monocacy Welcomes New Superintendent

Monocacy Superintendent Rick Slade
New Monocacy Superintendent, Rick Slade

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News Release Date: March 12, 2013

Please welcome Rick Slade, Monocacy National Battlefield's new superintendent.  Rick comes from Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area in Atlanta, where he served as chief of planning and resource management. There he expanded the park's involvement in river corridor projects, successfully working and collaborating with stakeholders to advance common goals.

"Rick's varied operational background - from planning and project management, education and partnerships, to conservation and historic preservation - will serve the park well as it prepares for the battle's sesquicentennial and plans for its future," says Regional Director Stephen E. Whitesell.

In his first job with the National Park Service, Slade served as the chief of education and resource management at Amistad National Recreation Area on the Texas-Mexico border. 

Prior to joining the NPS in 2002, Rick worked as a program evaluator in GAO's Natural Resources and Environment Division and as a program officer with the Asia Pacific division of Conservation International.  He holds a master's degree in anthropology from the University of Virginia and a bachelor's degree in Germanic literature and languages from the University of Kansas. 

"I am honored to be selected as the superintendent of Monocacy National Battlefield," Slade said. "One of the most rewarding aspects of working for the National Park Service is the opportunity to work beyond park boundaries with a wide variety of stakeholders. I'm excited to explore these opportunities within the thriving area around Frederick. I look forward to working with park staff, partners and the community to build long-term, mutually beneficial relationships and support for the park."

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

White-tailed deer are found in abundance on the battlefield. The rising population of deer has an intense affect on the herbaceous and woody plants found within the park, and several studies have recently been conducted on the effects of the overpopulation of deer. More...