• View through the barbed wire from inside the camp looking east.

    Minidoka

    National Historic Site ID,WA

Japanese American Experience

National Park Service Sites

Manzanar National Historic Site in CA was another of the ten World War II camps that held Japanese American Internees.

WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument
Spanning nearly all of the Pacific Ocean, World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument preserves and interprets the stories and key events in the Pacific Theater leading up to the U.S. entering World War II, its impacts on the mainland, through to the Peace Treaty in Tokyo Bay, Japan ending the war.

Tule Lake Unit Tule Lake became a monument along with other units in Hawaii and Alaska by Presidential Proclamation in December 2008. Tule Lake includes sites in the Tule Lake Basin where Japanese Americans were incarcerated during WWII.

Other Sites

Densho is a website whose mission is to preserve the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. They offer oral history accounts, coupled with historical images and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy and promote equal justice for all.

Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles houses exhibits and artifacts that chronicle most aspects of the Japanese experience in America.

The Wing Luke Asian Museum in Seattle engages the public in exploring issues related to the culture, art, and history of Asian Pacific Americans.

The Bainbridge Island Historical Society on Bainbridge Island seeks to collect, interpret, safeguard and display significant items from Bainbridge Island's colorful past.

The Oregon Nikkei Legacy which is sharing and preserving Japanese American history and culture in Portland's Old Town neighborhood, where Japantown once thrived.

The Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community tells about the history of the Bainbridge Island community as well as current activities that maintain community connections, celebrate diversity, and promote civil liberties education.

The Empty Chair Project is a memorial to the WWII Japanese-American Internees of Juneau, Alaska.

Park Home

Did You Know?

Scrambled eggs were served for breakfast.

Per regulations eggs were to be served four times a week, one to a person and for breakfast only. Source; Arthur Kleinkopf’s diary