• Aerial photograph of Big Hidatsa National Historic Landmark, located within Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site.

    Knife River Indian Villages

    National Historic Site North Dakota

Spring in-the Field Photography Workshop

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Date: May 4, 2010
Contact: Dorothy Cook, 701-745-3300

Spring in-the Field Photography Workshop at

 Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site

 

Knife River Indian Villages NHS is hosting its third-annual Spring Outdoor Photography Workshop on Saturday, May 15th.  This year’s free, spring event, which takes place at the national park unit one-half mile north of Stanton, will focus upon “macro photography,” the art of taking close-up pictures that reveal details which can’t be seen with the naked eye.  In wildlife, outdoor themes include insects, flowers, and other small, intricate subjects. 

                     

“For most visitors and hikers, it is the large, wide-angle details that is focused upon, most often overlooking the intricate ‘tiny world’ of detail that is often right below where we tread,” stated Knife River Superintendent Brian McCutchen.  This season’s workshop will encourage participants to look at such miniature details and provide guidance on how to use their cameras to capture such small details

 

Photographer Joel Smith of Bismarck, who practices the art of macro photography in wildlife settings, will be leading the workshop and providing guidance and assistance to event participants.  “Joel has provided the park with some truly amazing photographs of the park’s tiniest of creatures – in their natural setting, unabated,” McCutchen added.  “His work is remarkable.”

 

Did You Know?

Bow and Quiver

That Plains Indian boys were expected to learn to ride horse as early as four to five years of age and were given a bow and arrow as soon as they were able to walk?